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Voting on Louisiana Proposed Constitutional Amendments 1978-2015

Voting on Louisiana Proposed Constitutional Amendments 1978-2016

November 8, 2016

(1) Establishes new requirements for local registrars of voters – A vote for would require standards of professional and educational experience for local registrars of voters and more public disclosure in their hiring process. A vote against would leave the existing job requirements in place and allow local governing authorities greater discretion when filling registrar vacancies.

Act 677 (Rep. Danahay) amends Article XI, Section 5.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 73% AGAINST: 27%

(2) Tuition and fee autonomy to college management boards – A vote for would let higher education management boards set annual tuition rates and fee amounts for colleges and universities without legislative approval. A vote against would preserve the state Legislature’s authority over tuition and fee levels.

Act 680 (Sen. Morrish) adds Article VIII, Section 7.2.

Failed—VOTE FOR: 43% AGAINST: 57%

(3) Eliminates federal income tax deduction for corporations on state tax returns and sets a flat rate – A vote for would eliminate the deduction for federal income taxes paid by corporations when calculating state income taxes while triggering a flat corporate tax rate of 6.5%. A vote against would allow corporations to continue receiving a state income tax deduction for federal income taxes paid and allow the existing corporate tax rates and brackets to remain..

Act 31 (Rep. Leger) amends Article VII, Section 4(A).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 44% AGAINST: 56%

(4) Property tax exemption for surviving spouses of persons killed in the line of duty – A vote for would give surviving spouses of military, fire protection officers and law enforcement personnel who died while on duty a full property tax exemption on their home. A vote against would leave existing ad valorem property tax exemption levels and eligibility requirements in place.

Act 678 (Rep. Johnson) adds Article VII, Section 21(M).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 72% AGAINST: 28%

(5) Creates a Revenue Stabilization Trust Fund– A vote for would create the Revenue Stabilization Trust Fund to receive a portion of revenues from corporate and mineral taxes and to spend the money on infrastructure and pension liabilities. A vote against would continue to allow corporate tax and mineral revenue above a certain threshold to flow into the state general fund for appropriation by the legislature.

Act 679 (Rep. Leger) adds Article VII, Section 10(F)(4)(h), 10.15, and 10.16.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

(6) Adjusts threshold for tapping protected funds – A vote for would provide legislators a new way to tap into constitutionally protected funds during revenue downturns and also extends protection to five existing funds. A vote against would keep in place the existing trigger which allows the Legislature to tap into otherwise protected funds.

Act 681 (Sen. Allain) amends Article VII, Section 10(F)(2)(b); and adds Article VII, Section 10(F)(4)(h), (i), (j), (k), and (l)).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 42% AGAINST: 58%

 

October 24, 2015
(1) Creates new transportation projects fund and restructures the rainy day fund – A vote for would steer state mineral revenue toward transportation projects rather than all the money being deposited into the Budget Stabilization Fund. A vote against would leave current revenue flow and Budget Stabilization Fund intact.

Act 473 (Sen. Adley) of the 2015 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10(D)(2)(d), the introductory paragraph of 10.3(A) and the introductory paragraph of 10.3(A)(2)(a)and(b), and 10.5(B), and adds Article VII, Section 10.3(A)(2)(c).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 47% AGAINST: 53%

(2) Allows the state treasurer the option of investing in the state infrastructure bank – A vote for would allow the treasurer to invest public funds in a state infrastructure bank. A vote against would require the newly created infrastructure bank to rely on other financing.

Act 471 (Rep. St. Germain and Rep. Armes) of the 2015 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14(B).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 53% AGAINST: 47%

(3) New Guidelines for legislation in a fiscal session – A vote for would broadly define what kind of tax and revenue bills can be filed in a legislative fiscal session. A vote against would leave in place the specific list of allowable tax legislation for fiscal sessions.

Act 472 (Rep. Stokes) of the 2015 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2(A)(4)(b).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 46% AGAINST: 54%

(4) Local governments to tax property within their jurisdictions that is owned by local or state governments outside of Louisiana – A vote for would require states or local governments outside of the Louisiana to pay taxes on properties they own in Louisiana. A vote against would leave the question to the courts, which recently ruled that state and local governments outside Louisiana are exempt from property tax.

Act 470 (Rep. Chaney and Sen. Thompson) of the 2015 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21(A).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

 

November 4, 2014
(1) Medical trust fund and healthcare provider base rate – A vote for would give constitutional protection to provisions in the Louisiana Medical Assistance Trust Fund and set a baseline compensation rate for nursing homes and certain other healthcare providers that pay a provider fee. A vote against would not give special constitutional protections to the trust fund or establish a minimum base rate for healthcare providers.

Act 439 (Rep. Kleckley) of the 2013 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.14.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(2) Hospital assessment, trust fund and fee formula – A vote for would allow an assessment on hospitals to draw down more federal Medicaid dollars for the institutions and create a Hospital Stabiliza­tion Fund. A vote against would leave current hospital funding methods as they are, with no new assessment and no special constitutional fund.

Act 438 (Rep. Kleckley) of the 2013 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.13.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(3) Sales of Property with Delinquent Taxes – A vote for would allow local governments the option to use a private firm to assist in the collection of delinquent property taxes and the process of selling property whose owners are tax delinquent. A vote against would keep the current law, which prohibits some forms of outsourced tax collection fees according to recent court rulings.

Act 871 (Rep. Berthelot) of the 2014 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 25(A)(1) and (E).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 36% AGAINST: 64%

(4) Fund transfers for an infrastructure bank – A vote for would allow the State Treasurer to invest public funds into a Louisiana Transportation Infrastructure Bank, in the event that such a bank is created. A vote against would not give permission to the State Treasurer to invest public funds in a Louisiana Trans­portation Infrastructure Bank.

Act 873 (Rep. St. Germain and Sen. Thompson) of the 2014 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14(B).

FAILED —VOTE FOR: 32% AGAINST: 67%

(5) Elimination of the mandatory retirement age of judges – A vote for would eliminate the mandatory retirement age of 70 for judges. A vote against would keep the mandatory retirement age of 70 for judges.

Act 875 (Rep. Edwards and Senator Lafleur) of the 2014 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 23.

FAILED —VOTE FOR: 42% AGAINST: 58%

(6) Higher millage cap for police and fire protection in Orleans Parish – A vote for would raise the Orleans Parish special millage caps for police and fire protection from five to 10 mills, giving the New Orleans City Council authority to levy additional mills with voter approval. A vote against would keep the Orleans Parish special millage caps for police and fire protection at five mills.

Act 870 (Rep. Leger) of the 2014 Regular Session, amending Article VI, Section 26(E).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(7) Property tax exemption for certain disabled veterans – A vote for would give a bonus homestead exemption to veterans rated with 100% “unemployability” in parishes where a similar tax break has been approved by voters. A vote against would mean that veterans who are rated 100 percent unemployable but less than 100 percent disabled would not receive the additional homestead exemption.

Act 433 (Sen. Adley) of the 2013 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 21(K)(1), 6(B)(1) and (3).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 74% AGAINST: 26%

(8) Artificial Reef Development Fund – A vote for would establish the Artificial Reef Development Fund in the constitution and prohibit using its money for purposes other than those described in the amendment. A vote against would mean leave the fund as it currently exists—as a statutory entity—which allows it to be “swept” when the government needs money to balance the state’s budget.

Act 434 (Sen. Allain) of the 2013 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.11.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 57% AGAINST 43%

(9) Tax exemption reporting for permanently disabled residents – A vote for would eliminate the requirement that homeowners under the age of 65 who are permanently disabled must certify every year that their income meets the threshold for an assess­ment freeze. A vote against would mean that permanently disabled homeowners under the age of 65 would have to continue to certify each year that their income meets the requirements for the freeze.

Act 432 (Sen. Morrell and Reps. Barrow, Ritchie and Thibaut) of the 2013 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 18 (G)(1)(a)(iv).

FAILED —VOTE FOR: 47% AGAINST: 53%

(10) Tax sale of vacant, blighted or abandoned property – A vote for would require each parish to shorten the redemption period for vacant blighted or abandoned property sold at a tax sale to 18 months after the sale has been recorded. A vote against would leave the redemption period as is—three years from the date the sale has been recorded—except in Orleans Parish, which already has an 18-month redemption period.

Act 436 (Rep. Williams and Senator Johns) of the 2013 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 25(B)(3).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

(11) Increase the number of state departments from 20 to 21– A vote for would increase the limit of allowed state govern­ment departments from 20 to 21, effectively creating a Department of Elderly Affairs. A vote against would leave the current limit in place but would not necessarily prevent the future creation of a Department of Elderly Affairs.

Act 874 (Rep. Harrison) of the 2014 Regular Session, amending Article IV, Section (1)(B).

FAILED —VOTE FOR: 30% AGAINST: 70%

(12) Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission membership – A vote for would change the membership of the Wildlife and Fisheries Commission to require that two at-large members come from parishes north of a line created by Allen, Avoyelles, Beauregard, Evangeline and Pointe Coupee. A vote against would leave the membership as it currently stands— with three members from the coastal parishes and four selected from the state at large.

Act 437 (Rep. Armes) of the 2013 Regular Session, amending Article IX, Section 7(A).

FAILED —VOTE FOR: 41% AGAINST: 59%

(13) Orleans Lower Ninth Ward vacant property – A vote for would allow government-owned property in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans to be sold to specified classes of buyers at a nominal rate to be established by the Legislature. A vote against would not allow this type of property sale in the Lower Ninth Ward.

Act 872 (Rep. Bishop) of the 2014 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section (14)(B).

FAILED —VOTE FOR: 41% AGAINST: 59%

(14) Tax rebates, incentives and abatements – A vote for would forbid the introduction of legislation related to tax rebates, tax incentives or tax abatements in even-numbered years when the Legislature holds a general session and specifically allow such legislation in odd-numbered years during fiscal sessions. A vote against would mean legislators could continue to introduce legislation related to tax rebates, tax incentives or tax abatements in general sessions.

Act 435 (Rep. James) of the 2013 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2(A)(3)(b) and (4)(b)(introductory paragraph).

FAILED —VOTE FOR: 41% AGAINST: 59%

 

November 6, 2012
/” name=”November62012election1″>(1) Medicaid Trust Fund for the Elderly – A vote for would prohibit the Legislature or governor from taking money from the Medicaid Trust Fund for the Elderly to help balance the state operating budget. A vote against would leave the possibility that money could be taken from the fund.
Act 873 (Sen. Buffington) of the 2012 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10(F)(4)(g).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 71% AGAINST: 29%
(2) Strict Scrutiny Standard for Gun Laws – A vote for would require that any laws restricting the right to keep and bear arms be subject to the highest level of judicial review, known as strict scrutiny. Also, the amendment would say that the right to keep and bear arms is a fundamental one in Louisiana. It would delete a line in the Constitution that says the right to keep and bear arms shall not prevent the passage of laws to prohibit the carrying of concealed weapons. A vote against would retain the existing language in the Constitution, which affirms that the right to keep and bear arms shall not be abridged but does not require strict scrutiny of arms laws and expressly allows the Legislature to regulate concealed weapons.
Act 874 (Sen. Riser) of the 2012 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 11.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 73% AGAINST: 27%
(3) Earlier Notice of Public Retirement System Bills – A vote for would require that bills affecting the state’s public retirement systems be filed a month earlier than other types of legislation submitted prior to a legislative session. A vote for also would double the public notice period for prefiled retirement bills. A vote against would mean bills affecting public retirement systems would continue to be subject to the same prefiling period and public notice requirements as they are now.
Act 872 (Sen. Guillory) of the 2012 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2(A)(2), Article X, Section 29(C) and Article XIII, Section 1(A).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%
(4) Property Tax Exemption for Spouses of Certain Disabled Veterans – A vote for would allow the spouse of a deceased veteran who had a 100 percent service-connected disability rating to claim a higher homestead exemption even if the exemption was not in effect at the time the veteran died. A vote against would mean the spouse could not claim the higher exemption if the veteran died before it took effect.
Act 875 (Sen. Amedee) of the 2012 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21(K)(1).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 74% AGAINST: 26%
(5) Forfeiture of Public Retirement Benefits for Convicted Public Servants – A vote for would allow the courts to include forfeiture of a portion of public retirement benefits as part of the sentence for a public servant convicted of a felony related to his or her office. A vote against would leave the current system in place, which means a public servant convicted of a felony related to his or her office would be allowed to keep whatever public retirement benefits he or she has earned, except for court-ordered restitution and other specific circumstances already described in law.
Act 868 (Reps. Ligi and Champagne) of the 2012 Regular Session, adding Article X, Section 29(G). Companion legislation is Act 479 (Rep. Ligi).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%
(6) Property Tax Exemption Authority for New Iberia – A vote for would allow New Iberia to grant city property tax exemptions to any property owner annexed into the city after Jan. 1, 2013. A vote against would mean the city would be unable to grant such exemptions to property owners annexed into the city.
Act 869 (Rep. Barras) of the 2012 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 21(L).
FAILED—VOTE FOR: 42% AGAINST: 58%
(7) Membership of Certain State Boards and Commissions – A vote for would adjust the membership selection process for constitutionally created boards and commissions that have members selected based on the state’s congressional districts. A vote against would leave the membership selection process for constitutionally created boards and commissions as it is now—based on a soon-to-be outdated number of congressional districts.
Act 870 (Rep. Tim Burns) of the 2012 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 5(B)(1), 6(B)(1) and Article X, Sections 3(A) and 43(A), and adding Article VII, Section 8(D). Companion legislation is that part of Act 803 (Rep. Tim Burns) that focuses on the six constitutionally created boards and commissions outlined previously.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%
(8) Property Tax Exemption for Non-Manufacturing Businesses – A vote for would allow the state Board of Commerce and Industry to grant local property tax exemption contracts to a targeted group of non-manufacturing businesses in parishes that choose to participate in the program. A vote against would mean these targeted non-manufacturing businesses would continue to be ineligible for property tax exemptions.
Act 871 (Rep. Robideaux) of the 2012 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 21(L). Companion legislation is Act 499 (Rep. Robideaux).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 52% AGAINST 48%
(9) Crime Prevention and Security Districts – A vote for would increase the number of times that bills to create crime prevention and security districts must be advertised and require that the notices of intent state whether a parcel fee would be imposed and collected, whether the fee could be imposed or increased without an election, and what the maximum amount of the fee would be. A vote against would mean crime prevention and security district bills would continue to be subject to the same public notice requirements as they are now.
Act 876 (Sen. Claitor) of the 2012 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 13.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%
November 19, 2011 Election

(1) Taxes and Fees on Sale or Transfer of Real Estate — A vote for would prohibit the levy of new taxes or fees upon the sale or transfer of immovable property after November 30, 2011. A vote against would leave the Constitution silent on the issue, meaning that the Legislature could pass statutes to create new real estate transfer taxes in the future.

Act 425 (Rep. Nowlin) of the 2011 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 2.3.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 81% AGAINST: 19%

October 22, 2011 Election

(1) Funding TOPS & Sustaining Cigarette Tax Revenue — A Vote for would dedicate a new funding source for TOPS by redirecting annual tobacco settlement proceeds from the Millennium Trust to the college scholarship fund and place a portion of the cigarette tax permanently in the Constitution. A vote against would leave unchanged the type of financing sources available for TOPS and allow a current 4-cent per pack cigarette tax to expire.
Act 423 (Sen. Alario) of the 2011 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 10.8(A) and (C), and adding Article VII, Section 4.1. Companion legislation is Act 386 (Sen. Alario).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%
(2) Reducing the Financial Liability of State Retirement Systems — A vote for would require the Legislature to designate certain percentages of the state’s nonrecurring revenue to reduce the long-term financial shortfall of the state employee (LASERS) and teacher (TRSL) retirement systems. A vote against would still allow the Legislature to appropriate nonrecurring revenue to retiring the unfunded accrued liability of public retirement systems but would not require such.

Act 422 (Rep. Pearson and Sen. Gautreaux) of the 2011 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10(D). Companion legislation is Act 357 (Rep. Pearson and Sen. Gautreaux).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%
(3) Protecting the Patient’s Compensation Fund — A vote for would protect the Patient’s Compensation Fund from legislative appropriation by establishing it in the Constitution and defining it as a private custodial fund to be used only for the benefit and protection of medical malpractice claimants and qualified health care providers. A vote against would retain the existing statutory definition of the Patient’s Compensation Fund, which could subject the Fund to appropriation by the Legislature for other budgeting purposes.

Act 421 (Rep. Hazel) of the 2011 Regular Session, adding Article XII, Section 16. Companion legislation is Act 263 (Rep. Hazel).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 53% AGAINST: 47%
(4) Managing the Budget Stabilization “Rainy Day” Fund — A vote for would provide that if money is withdrawn from the Budget Stabilization Fund, the state must begin to replenish the Fund during the second fiscal year after the money was withdrawn, paying back the withdrawn amount in thirds each year until fully repaid or until the Fund reaches its statutory cap. A vote against would leave the state to deal with its current statute, which prohibits money taken from the Budget Stabilization Fund from being replenished in the same fiscal year that it was withdrawn or the following fiscal year. However, this law is being challenged in court as unconstitutional and could be overturned.

Act 424 (Sen. Chaisson) of the 2011 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.3(C). Companion legislation is Act 383 (Sen. Chaisson).

FAIL—VOTE FOR: 49% AGAINST: 51
(5) Updating the Census Change in a New Orleans Tax Sales Law — A vote for would identify the City of New Orleans by name rather than by reference to its outdated 2000 Census population in a section of the Constitution regarding auctions of tax-delinquent properties. A vote against would leave the outdated Census population reference in the Constitution with the result that New Orleans would not maintain an existing exemption from the minimum bid requirements for property tax sales.

Act 43 (Rep. Leger) of the 2011 First Special Session, amending Article VII, Section 25(A)(2) of the Constitution.

FAIL—VOTE FOR: 48% AGAINST: 52%

November 2, 2010 Election
(1) Timing of Salary Increase for Elected Officials — A vote for would require that an increase in the salary of statewide elected officials, public service commissioners or legislators could not take effect until the beginning of the next term after the increase was approved. A vote against would continue to allow an increase in the salary of statewide elected officials, public service commissioners or legislators to take effect at any time, including during the term of the legislator who voted for the increase.
Act 539 (Sen. McPherson)) of the 2009 Regular Session, amending Article IV, Section 4; adds Article III, Section 4(G) and Article IV, Section 21(F)
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 73% AGAINST: 48%
(2) Severance Tax Allowance — A vote for would dedicate additional state severance tax revenue to parishes of origin, restrict the use of a portion of these funds and dedicate a portion of severance taxes collected on state lands to the Atchafalaya Basin Conservation Fund. A vote against would maintain the limit on severance tax revenue that must be paid by the state to parishes at $850,000 per year, adjusted annually for inflation.
Act 541 (Rep. Gallot) of the 2009 Regular Session, effective April 1, 2012, adds Article VII, Section 4(D)(4)
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%
(3) Homestead Exemption for Disabled Veterans — A vote for would give each parish governing authority the option to call an election on whether to double the homestead exemption available to veterans with a service-connected disability rating of 100 percent and certain surviving spouses. A vote against would maintain the current homestead exemption ($7,500 of assessed value) for all homeowners and provide no additional exemption for veterans.
Act 1049 (Rep. Pope) of the 2010 Regular Session, effective January 1, 2011, adds Article VII, Section 21(K)
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 65% AGAINST: 35%
(4) Property Tax Millage Rate Increases by Non-Elected Bodies — A vote for would limit the property tax millage increase (roll-up) that certain taxing bodies, whose members are not all elected, could impose following a mandatory millage decrease (rollback) due to reassessment. The millage adjustment could not increase taxes more than 2.5 percent above the amount collected the previous year. A vote against would continue to allow all local taxing bodies to roll a millage back up to the previous maximum authorized rate, following a mandatory reassessment roll-back.
Act 542 (Rep. Arnold) of the 2009 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 23(C)
FAILED—VOTE FOR: 48% AGAINST: 52%
(5) Post-Disaster Occupancy Grace Period — A vote for would allow homeowners displaced by disaster to apply for a second five-year extension on their special assessment levels and homestead exemptions if they are unable to reoccupy their homes due to a pending appeal on damage claims. A vote against would continue to allow a single five-year period in which homeowners displaced by a disaster could reoccupy their homes before they lose their special assessment levels and homestead exemptions.
Act 1050 (Sen. Murray) of the 2010 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 18(G)(5) and 20(A)(10). Companion legislation is ACT 865 (Rep. Murray) of the 2010 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 62% AGAINST: 38%
(6) Legislative Votes for Retirement Benefit Changes — A vote for would require simple majority legislative approval for changes to benefit provisions of any public retirement system subject to legislative authority, and would require two-thirds legislative approval when the proposed change has an actuarial cost. A vote against would continue to allow certain retirement systems to change benefit provisions for their members without legislative approval, and would continue to allow the Legislature to increase the benefits for members of state and statewide public retirement systems with a simple majority vote.
Act 1048 (Rep. Pearson) of the 2010 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 29(E)(5); Adds Article X, Section 29(F)
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 65% AGAINST: 35%
(7) Tax Sale for Delinquent Property Taxes — A vote for would change the bidding rules for tax sale auctions and would allow tax collectors to charge additional penalties for the nonpayment of property taxes. A vote against would maintain the current bidding process and would continue to exclude certain charges from the list of delinquent amounts that can be recovered through a tax sale.
Act 540 (Rep. Leger) of the 2009 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 25(A)(1) and (E)
FAILED—VOTE FOR: 45% AGAINST: 55%
(8) Sale of Expropriated Property — A vote for would remove the requirement that public authorities first offer expropriated property for re-sale to its prior owner before the property can be sold to a third party if the property was taken to remove a threat to public health or safety and was held for 30 years or less. A vote against would continue to grant the right of first refusal to former owners of property taken to remove a threat to public health or safety when it has been held for 30 years or less.
Act 1052 (Rep. Leger) of the 2010 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 4(H)(1)
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%
(9) Judgment of Workers Compensation Claims — A vote for would require that, under certain circumstances, workers’ compensation cases be reargued before a panel of five or more appellate judges prior to the reversal or modification of an administrative agency’s decision. A vote against would continue to allow administrative agency decisions in workers’ compensation claims to be reversed or modified with only a majority vote of a panel of three appellate judges.
Act 1051 (Sen. Murray) of the 2010 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 8(B)
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 57% AGAINST: 43%
(10) Waivers of Jury Trials for Criminal Defendants — A vote for would allow criminal defendants to waive their right to a jury trial in non-capital cases only if the waiver was made at least 45 days prior to the beginning of trial and would provide that once the waiver was made, it could not be revoked. A vote against would continue to allow criminal defendants to waive their right to a jury trial in non-capital cases without any time restriction and would remain silent as to whether such a waiver could later be revoked.
Act 1053 (Rep. Montoucet) of the 2010 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 17(A)
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%

October 2, 2010 Election

(1) Legislative Session Dates A vote for would establish earlier starting dates for all regular legislative sessions from the final Monday in the month in which they begin to the second Monday. It also would make legislation effective on Aug. 1 instead of Aug. 15 unless a different date is specified in the bill. A vote against would continue to require that regular legislative sessions begin on the last Monday in March (even-numbered years) or the last Monday in April (odd-numbered years), and that legislation passed take effect on Aug. 15 of the year in which it passed unless a different date is specified in the bill.
Act 537 (Senator Riser) of the 2009 Regular Session, amending Article III, Sections 2(A)(3)(a) and (4)(a) and 19.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 63% AGAINST: 37%
(2) Civil Service Status for GOHSEP Employees A vote for would make all of the positions in the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Prepardness (GOHSEP) a part of the unclassified civil service. A vote against would leave a conflict between the statutes and the Constitution on the matter of whether employees of the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Prepardness (GOHSEP) are members of the classified or unclassified civil service.
Act 538 (Senator Walsworth) of the 2009 Regular Session, amending Article X, Sections 2(B)(11) and (12), and adding Section 2(B)(13).
PASSED— VOTE FOR: 52% AGAINST: 48%

November 4, 2008 Election
(1) Term Limits for Members of Boards and Commissions A vote for would impose term limits for members of certain state boards and commissions. A vote against would continue to allow members of certain state boards and commissions to be elected or appointed for an unlimited number of terms.
Act 935 (Senator Mount) of the 2008 Regular Session, amending Article IV, Section 21(A); Article VIII, Sections 3(B), 5(B), 6(B), 7(B), 3 and 7.1(B); Article IX, Section 8(B) and Article X, Sections 3(B) and 43(B) and to add Article IV, Section 22. Companion legislation is Act 875 (Senator Mount) of the 2008 Regular Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 69% AGAINST: 31%
(2) Term Limits for Calling Special Sessions A vote for would require that the call for a special legislative session be issued at least seven calendar days prior to the start of the session. A vote against would continue the requirement that the call for a special legislative session be issued at least five days prior to the start of the session.
Act 937 (Senator Adley) of the 2008 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2(B).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 60% AGAINST: 40%
(3) Temporary Successors for Legislators Ordered to Active Military Duty A vote for would allow the Legislature to appoint a temporary successor for any legislator called to active military duty that prevents performance of the duties of office. A vote against would continue to require districts to be without representation in the case of their elected legislator being called away to active military duty and refusing to resign.
Act 931 (Representative Lorusso) of the 2008 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 4(F). Companion legislation is Act 702 (Representative Lorusso) of the 2008 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 62% AGAINST: 38%
(4) State Severance Taxes to Parishes A vote for would dedicate additional state severance taxes to parishes of origin, restrict the use of a portion of these funds and dedicate a portion of severance taxes collected on state lands to the Atchafalaya Basin Conservation Fund. A vote against would maintain the maximum amount of severance tax revenue that has to be paid by the state to parishes at $850,000, adjusted annually for inflation.
Act 932 (Representative Gallot) of the 2008 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 4(D)(3) and to enact Article VII, Section 4(D)(4) and (5).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 45% AGAINST: 55%

(5) Transfer of Special Property Tax Assessment Level A vote for would allow homeowners to transfer any special property tax assessment level to their new homes when their property is sold to or expropriated by the state, federal or local government. A vote against would continue to prohibit the transfer of special property tax assessment levels to new properties.
Act 933 (Representative Ritchie) of the 2008 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 18(G)(6).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 50% AGAINST: 50%

(6) Re-Sale of Certain Expropriated Property A vote for would remove the requirement that public authorities first offer expropriated property back to its prior owner before the property can be sold to a third party if the property was taken to remove a threat to public health or safety and was held for less than 30 years. It also would remove the requirement that such property be sold by public bid and eliminate the opportunity for certain property owners to challenge surplus takings. A vote against would maintain the same re-sale requirements for property taken to remove a threat to public health and safety as for property taken for other public purposes.
Act 936 (Senator Murray) of the 2008 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 4(H)(5).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 49% AGAINST: 51%

(7) Investment of Non-Pension Benefit Trusts A vote for would allow public funds reserved for non-pension, post-employment benefits to be invested in stocks. A vote against would continue to prohibit public funds reserved for non-pension, post-employment benefits from being invested in stocks.
Act 934 (Representative Downs) of the 2008 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14(B). Related legislation is Act 87 (Representative Downs) and Act 910 (Senator Michot) of the 2008 Regular Session.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 44% AGAINST: 56%

October 20,2007 Election
(1) Supplemental Pay Protection A vote for would constitutionally protect current and future statutory supplemental pay levels, regardless of amount, for fulltime local law enforcement officers and firefighters. A vote against would continue constitutional protection for the $300 monthly supplemental pay amount for full-time local law enforcement officers and firefighters, as it was set by statute on July 1, 2001.
Act 483 (Senator Fontenot) of the 2007 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10(D).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%
(2) Supplemental Pay Expansion A vote for would authorize the Legislature to provide state funded supplemental pay to fulltime, commissioned state law enforcement officers who patrol waterways and riverfront areas and port authority firefighters. A vote against would continue to exclude state law enforcement officers and firefighters from the supplemental pay program.

Act 485 (Senator Heitmeier) of the 2007 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 10(A). Companion legislation is Act 275 (Senator Heitmeier) of the 2007 Regular Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%
(3) Funding of State Retirement Systems A vote for would forbid
the approval of future benefit increases for public employees in the state retirement systems unless funding was identified and sufficient to pay the cost of the benefit within 10 years. A vote against would allow the continued approval of benefit increases for public employees in the state
retirement systems, as long as the cost of the benefit could be paid within 30 years.

Act 484 (Senator Boasso) of the 2007 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 29(E).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%
(4) Property Tax for Consigned Jewelry A vote for would grant a property tax exemption for jewelry placed on consignment with art and jewelry dealers. A vote against would maintain the current property tax exemption for consigned artwork, which does not include jewelry.

Act 486 (Representative Jack Smith) of the 2007 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21(C).
FAILED—VOTE FOR: 44% AGAINST: 56%

November 7, 2006 Election
(1) Property Tax Assessment Freeze for Military and Disabled A vote for would expand eligibility for a property tax assessment freeze to certain current and former military members, certain people with permanent and total disabilities and some of their surviving spouses. A vote against would continue to allow only those who are 65 years of age or older and some of their surviving spouses to be eligible for the property tax assessment freeze.
Act 511 (Senator Nevers) of the 2005 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 18(G).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 68% AGAINST: 32%
(2) Parish Severance Tax Allocation A vote for would increase the maximum amount of state oil and gas severance tax revenue a parish government could receive each year from $750,000 to $850,000. A vote against would retain the present limit at $750,000 per parish.

Act 864 (Representative Gallot) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 4(D).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%
(3) Property Tax Exemption for Leased Medical Equipment A vote for would exempt from property taxes certain medical equipment leased for five years or longer to small, rural nonprofit hospitals. A vote against would maintain a property tax exemption only for medical equipment owned, not leased, by small, rural nonprofit hospitals.

Act 510 (Senator Adley) of the 2005 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21(B).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%
(4) Municipal Property Tax Exemption for Motor Vehicles A vote for would exempt motor vehicles from municipal property taxes. A vote against would continue to allow municipalities to levy property taxes on motor vehicles.

Act 512 (Representative Arnold) of the 2005 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21(E).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%
(5) Property Tax Exemption for Consigned Art A vote for would grant a property tax exemption for art placed on consignment. A vote against would maintain the current property tax exemptions, which do not include consigned art.

Act 509 (Senator Bajoie) of the 2005 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21(C).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%
(6) New Family and Juvenile Judgeships A vote for would give the Legislature specific authority to create new family and juvenile judgeships. A vote against would leave some existing family and juvenile judgeships subject to legal challenge.

Act 862 (Representative R. Carter) of the 2006 Regular Session, adding Article V, Section 15(A).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%
(7) Consolidation of the New Orleans Assessors A vote for would consolidate the seven separate assessors in New Orleans into a single, parish-wide office. A vote against would maintain the seven separate assessors in New Orleans.

Act 863 (Senator Duplessis) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 24. Companion legislation is Act 622 (Senator Duplessis) of the 2006 Regular Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 78% AGAINST: 22%
(8) Central Community School System A vote for would establish the Central Community School System, a new public school district that would include four public schools that are now part of the East Baton Rouge Parish School System (EBRPSS). A vote against would maintain the status quo, and public schools in the Central community would remain part of the EBRPSS.

Act 861 (Representative White) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 13(D)(1). Companion legislation is Act 202 (Representative White) of the 2006 Regular Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%

September 30, 2006 Election
(1) Coastal Protection and Restoration Fund A vote for would change the name of the Wetlands Conservation and Restoration Fund to the Coastal Protection and Restoration Fund and would deposit into that fund all potential federal revenues from Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities. A vote against would retain the current name and allow potential federal revenues from Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities to be deposited in the general state treasury fund.
Act 69 (Senator Dupre) of the 2005 1st Extraordinary Session, amending Article VII, Sections 10(D)(2)(e), 10.2 and 10.5(B) and (C). Companion legislation is Act 8 (Senator Dupre) of the 2005 1st Extraordinary Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 82% AGAINST: 18%
(2) Consolidation of Coastal Funds A vote for would consolidate the Louisiana Coastal Restoration Fund and its future revenue into either the Wetlands Conservation and Restoration Fund or the Coastal Protection and Restoration Fund. A vote against would maintain a separate Louisiana Coastal Restoration Fund.

Act 854 (Senator Dardenne) of the 2006 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.2 (F) and repealing Article VII, Section 10.11. Companion legislation is Act 548 (Senator Dupre) of the 2006 Regular Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 79% AGAINST: 21%
(3) Regional Flood Protection Authorities A vote for would authorize the legislature to establish regional flood control authorities and create two in southeast Louisiana A vote against would maintain the current system of separate levee boards.

Act 43 (Senator Boasso) of the 2006 1st Extraordinary Session, amending Article VI, Sections 38(A)(1) and 39 and adding Section 38.1. Companion legislation is Act 1 (Senator Boasso) of the 2006 1st Extraordinary Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 81% AGAINST: 19%
(4) Hurricane Protection Liability A vote for would lower compensation paid by the government for private property taken for or damaged by hurricane protection projects. Buildings or structures damaged by a president declared emergency would remain eligible for higher compensation for three years after the emergency. A vote against would maintain the current higher compensation for private property taken for or damaged by hurricane protection projects.

Act 853 (Senator Dupre) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VI, Section 42(A) and adding Article I, Section 4(G). Companion legislation is Act 567 of the (Senator Dupre) of the 2006 Regular Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%
(5) Limits on Expropriation of Private Property A vote for would prohibit the taking of private property for many economic development projects. A vote against would continue to allow private property to be taken for economic development projects.

Act 851 (Senator McPherson) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending 19 Article I, Section 4(B) and Article VI, Section 21(A); and adding Article VI, Section 21(D).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%
(6) Procedures to Transfer Expropriated Property A vote for would change and provide in the constitution a method of selling and leasing some expropriated property. A vote against would leave in statute procedures for selling and leasing expropriated property.

Act 859 (Representative Farrar) of the 2006 Regular Session, adding Article I, Section 4(G).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 50% AGAINST: 50%
(7) Medicaid Trust Fund Investment A vote for would authorize the state to invest up to 35 percent of the Medicaid Trust Fund for the Elderly in stocks. A vote against would continue to prohibit the state from investing this fund in stocks.

Act 857 (Representative Daniel) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14(B).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 63% AGAINST: 37%
(8) Homestead Exemption and Special Assessments for Damaged Homes A vote for would allow persons unable to reoccupy homes damaged by a governor declared emergency to retain the homestead exemption for a set period of time and provide for special assessments for eligible elderly. A vote against would result in the loss of the homestead exemption and special assessments for eligible elderly for those unable to reoccupy their homes within one year of a governor-declared emergency.

Act 70 (Representative Alario) of the 2005 First Extraordinary Session, adding Article VII, Section 18(G)(5) and Section 20(A)(10).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 79% AGAINST: 21%
(9) State Mandates on School Spending A vote for would prohibit some state mandates to increase local school spending unless the state provides for a local source of revenue and the local government authorizes its collection. The provision would not apply to a law approved by a two-thirds vote of the Legislature. A vote against would continue to allow the state to mandate increases in local school spending without providing a local funding source.

Act 855 (Senator Quinn) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VI, Section 14.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%
(10) Higher Education Investments A vote for would allow public or private colleges and universities to invest up to 35 percent of state-funded permanently endowed funds in stocks. A vote against would continue to prohibit public colleges and universities from investing state funds in stocks.

Act 856 (Representative Cazayoux) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14(B). The companion legislation is Act 717 (Representative Cazayoux) of the 2006 Regular Session.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%
(11) Homestead Exemption for Homes in Revocable Trusts A vote for would extend the homestead exemption to property placed in a revocable trust by a person who continues to occupy the home. A vote against would continue to allow the homestead exemption for irrevocable trusts, but not for revocable trusts.

Act 852 (Representative Triche) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 20(A).
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 66% AGAINST: 34%
(12) Vacancy in Statewide Elected Offices A vote for would require an election if there is a vacancy in the office of the lieutenant governor and more than a year remains in the term. It would also require a special election, if necessary, to fill vacancies in statewide elective offices. A vote against would continue to allow an appointed lieutenant governor to serve the remainder of the full term. It would also continue to allow elections to fill vacancies for statewide elected officials only on regularly scheduled election dates.

Act 858 (Representative Beard) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article IV, Sections 15 and 16.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 69% AGAINST: 31%
(13) Judges’ Qualifications A vote for would require judicial candidates to have been admitted to the practice of law for eight or 10 years, depending on the court, and reside in their districts for one year prior to qualifying for election. A vote against would continue to require state judges to be admitted to the practice of law for five years and reside in their districts for two years prior to qualifying for election.

Act 860 (Representative Greene) of the 2006 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 24.
PASSED—VOTE FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

November 2, 2004 Election
(1) Freedom to Hunt, Fish & Trap — A vote for would constitutionally protect the right to hunt, fish and trap, subject to the state’s duty to protect the natural resources and landowners’ rights against trespass. A vote against means a statement confirming the right to hunt, fish and trap would not be added to the constitution.

Act 927 (Senator McPherson) of the 2004 Regular Session adding Article I, Section 27.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 81% AGAINST: 19%
(2) Homestead Exemption — A vote for would ratify practices common to many assessors in granting homestead exemptions to certain persons whose eligibility has come into question. A vote against would leave in question or result in the loss of homestead exemptions granted by many assessors to certain persons sharing ownership of homes (including some surviving spouses, former spouses and unrelated owners); persons with homes in trusts; bond-for-deed buyers and use-value property.

Act 929 (Senator Dupre) of the 2004 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 20(A).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 78% AGAINST: 22%

(3) Veterans’ Preference — A vote for would extend the veterans’ preference for state and local civil service and state police employment to military service after September 11, 2001. A vote against would continue to deny veterans’ preference for certain military service after September 11, 2001.

Act 930 (Representative Futrell) of the 2004 Regular Session, amending Article X, Sections 10(A)(2) and 48(A)(2).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 81% AGAINST: 19%

(4) Agricultural & Seafood Fund — A vote for would establish the Agricultural and Seafood Products Support Fund to receive money from the licensing of state-owned trademarks or labels used to promote Louisiana products and would authorize the use of the Fund to assist Louisiana farmers and fishermen. A vote against would not establish a special fund in the constitution to assist Louisiana farmers and fishermen.

Act 928 (Senator Nevers) of the 2004 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.12. Companion legislation is Act 58 (Senator Nevers) of the 2004 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 67% AGAINST: 33%

September 18, 2004 Election
(1) The Defense of Marriage Act — A vote for would constitutionlly define marriage as the union of one man and one woman and prohibit the recognition of same-sex marriages or civil unions of unmarried opposite-sex and same-sex couples created under any states’ laws. A vote against would continue to define marriage statutorily as the union between one man and one woman and prohibit the recognition of same-sex marriages created under other states’ laws. State law does not currently address civil unions or domestic partnerships between unmarried opposite-sex and same-sex couples.

Act 926 (Representative Scalise of the 2004 Regular Session, adding Article XII, Section 15.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 78% AGAINST: 22%

October 4, 2003 Election

(1) Wetlands Conservation and Restoration Fund — A vote for would authorize $35 million annually of mineral revenue settlement funds to be deposited into the Wetlands Conservation and Restoration Fund; raise the cap on mineral revenues in the fund to no less than $500 million; and, add highway construction and Wetlands Fund deposits to the list of allowable uses of nonrecurring state revenue. A vote against would maintain the $40 million cap on mineral revenues in the Wetlands Fund and the existing list of allowable uses of nonrecurring state revenue.

Act 1302 (Senator Dupre) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.2 (B) and (C) and 10.5 (B) and (C), and adding Article VII, Section 10 (D)(2)(e) and (f). Companion legislation is Act 1195 (Senator Dupre) of the 2003 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 67% AGAINST: 33%

(2) Louisiana Coastal Restoration Fund — A vote for would create the Louisiana Coastal Restoration Fund and authorize the deposit into that fund of up to 20% of any future sale of the state’s tobacco settlement. A vote against would continue to allow the full amount from any future sale of the state’s tobacco settlement to be distributed among the special funds in the Millennium Trust.

Act 1300 Senator Dardenne) of the 2003 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.11. Companion legislation is Act 1192 (Senator Dardenne) of the 2003 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 68% AGAINST: 32%

(3) Coastal Restoration Liability — A vote for would limit, in the case of coastal restoration projects, the state’s liability for past and future damages to private property and the amount paid to purchase property. A vote against would not limit the state’s liability for property damaged by coastal restoration projects or change the amount paid for private property.

Act 1295 (Representative Pitre) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 4. Companion legislation is Act 583 (Representative Pitre) of the 2003 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%

(4) State Takeover of Failing Schools — A vote for would allow the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) to take temporary control of failing schools. A vote against would continue to prevent BESE from assuming control of local schools.

Act 1293 (Senator Theunissen and Representative Crane) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 3 (A). Companion legislation Act 9 (Senator Theunissen and Representative Crane) of the 2003 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 60% AGAINST: 40%

(5) LWCC Board — A vote for would change the method of selecting three of the twelve members of the Louisiana Workers’ Compensation Corporation (LWCC) Board of Directors. A vote against would retain the current method of appointing the LWCC board members.

Act 1294 (Representative Dewitt) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 8.1 (C)(1)(f) and (g); repealing Article XII, Section 8.1 (C)(1)(h). Companion legislation is Act 315 (Representative Dewitt) of the 2003 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(6) TIMED Projects — A vote for would change the TIMED highway widening program by dropping a segment of LA 15, switching segments to connect to a four-lane Arkansas route and adding eight miles left out of US 61. A vote against would continue the existing project descriptions.

Act 1301 (Senator Barham) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 27 (B).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%

(7) State Infrastructure Bank — A vote for would allow a state infrastructure bank to use public funds to make low-interest loans to parishes, municipalities or a state agency to build roads and highways. A vote against would continue to prohibit such a bank from loaning or pledging public funds to any public or private entity.

Act 1299 (Senator Heitmeier) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B). Companion legislation is Act 1125 (Representative Diez) of the 2003 Regular Session.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 43% AGAINST: 57%

(8) Offshore Drilling Rigs Tax Break — A vote for would, with subsequent voter approval in a given parish, exempt from property taxes drilling rigs for use in the Outer Continental Shelf but stored in that parish or being converted, renovated or repaired. A vote against would continue to allow such property to be taxed.

Act 1297 (Representative Pitre) of the 2003 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 21 (J).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(9) Dedication of Lottery Proceeds to Education — A vote for would dedicate the state lottery proceeds to elementary and secondary education, and allow up to $500,000 to be spent on problem gambling services. A vote against would continue to allow lottery proceeds to be used for any purpose.

Act 1305 (Representative Farrar) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 6 (A).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%

(10) Administrative Law System — A vote for would provide specific constitutional authority for the existing administrative law system and would provide that the Legislature may deny state agencies the right to appeal administrative law judge decisions. A vote against would continue the existing administrative law system and leave in question state agencies’ right to appeal.

Act 1298 (Representative Bowler) of the 2003 Regular Session, adding Article XII, Section 15.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 40% AGAINST: 60%

(11) Budget Stabilization Fund — A vote for would prevent the double-counting of certain mineral revenues for deposit in the state’s “Rainy Day” Fund and correct a drafting error. A vote against would continue to require certain mineral revenues to be deposited in the “Rainy Day” Fund under two procedures and continue to call the fund by the wrong name.

Act 1307 Representative LeBlanc) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.3 (A)(2)(a) (introductory paragraph) and 10.5 (B).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%

(12) Contraband — A vote for would clarify that the Legislature may authorize the seizure of property related to illegal activities. A vote against could potentially limit the seizure of property to only drug-related crimes and not to other illegal activity.

Act 1304 (Representative Devillier) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 4.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%

(13) Leasing Local Property — A vote for would allow a parish or municipality to lease property to a new or expanding industry at below-market rates. A vote against would continue to prohibit local governments from donating the use of their property.

Act 1303 (Representative Faucheux) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 41% AGAINST: 59%

(14) Legislative Auditor’s Political Activity — A vote for would constitutionally prohibit certain political activities by the legislative auditor and his staff and prohibit future legislative auditors from running for public office within two years of leaving office. A vote against would continue to limit the political activity of the legislative auditor and his employees through internal office policy only and continue to allow legislative auditors to run for public office within two years of leaving office.

Act 1306 (Representative LeBlanc) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 11.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 48% AGAINST: 52%

(15) Judges’ Retirement Age — A vote for would allow a judge who reaches the age of 70 while in office to complete his or her term. A vote against would continue to require mandatory retirement for all judges upon reaching 70 years of age.

Act 1296 (Representative Frith) of the 2003 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 23 (B).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 53% AGAINST: 47%

November 5, 2002 Election

(1) Legislative Sessions — A vote for would move fiscal sessions from even- to odd-numbered years, allow legislators to each introduce five non-fiscal bills and unlimited special and local bills in a fiscal session, and add 15 days to the fiscal session. A vote against would continue the present system of fiscal-only sessions in even-numbered years.

Act 1231 (Senator Hines) of the 2001 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2(A).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%

(2) Income/Sales Tax Swap — A vote for would permanently exempt food for home use, residential utilities (natural gas, electricity and water) and prescription drugs from the state sales tax; change the income tax brackets to lower the tax on lower incomes and raise the tax on higher incomes; and eliminate the income tax deduction for excess federal itemized deductions. A vote against would leave the income tax unchanged and permit continued temporary taxation of food and utilities.

Act 88 (Representative Stelly) of the 2002 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 4(A) and adding Section 2.2. Companion legislation is Act 51 (Representative Stelly) of the 2002 Regular Session.

NOTE: For an in-depth analysis of this amendment, see PAR Analysis No. 305 entitled “The ‘Stelly Plan:’ A Proposed Income/Sales Tax Swap.”

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(3) Budget Adjustments — A vote for would give the governor and Legislature more flexibility in dealing with budget deficits by allowing limited cuts in most constitutionally mandated or protected funds or expenditures. A vote against would continue to constitutionally protect many areas of the budget from being cut.

Act 1236 (Representative Daniel) of the 2001 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10(F). Companion legislation is Act 1063 (Representative Daniel) of the 2001 Regular Session.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%

(4) Removal of Public Employees — A vote for would require the termination of a classified or unclassified state or local public employee convicted of a felony during employment after all appeals have been exhausted. A vote against would continue to allow the state agency heads discretion in terminating classified employees and continue to allow local discretion in setting termination policies for local employees.

Act 166 (Senator Hainkel) of the First Extraordinary Session of 2002, adding Article X, Section 25.1.

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

(5) Retirement Communities Tax Break — A vote for would authorize property tax exemptions for up to 10 years for developers of retirement communities. A vote against would continue to limit property tax exemptions for retirement communities to those owned by nonprofit organizations or developed within a downtown, historic or economic development area.

Act 89 (Representative Thompson) of the 2002 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 21(J). Companion legislation is Act 57 (Representative Thompson) of the 2002 Regular Session.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 39% AGAINST: 61%

(6) Supplemental Pay — A vote for would constitutionally mandate a minimum $300 per month state pay supplement to full-time local law enforcement officers and fire fighters. A vote against would continue to allow funding cuts to be made in the supplemental pay program.

Act 1234 (Representative Toomy) of the 2001 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 11(A) and adding Article VII, Section 10(D)(3).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 63% AGAINST: 37%

(7) One-Time Filing For Senior Tax Break — A vote for would allow senior citizens to apply and meet an income eligibility test only once to receive a special property tax assessment. A vote against would continue to require annual application and income testing.

Act 87 (Representative Hebert) of the 2002 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 18(G)(1)(a) and 2(a).

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 68% AGAINST: 32%

(8) Higher Education Investments — A vote for would allow public colleges and universities to invest up to 50% of endowment or other permanent funds in stocks. A vote against would continue to prohibit public colleges and universities from investing in stocks.

Act 1235 (Representative Daniel) of the 2001 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14(B). Companion legislation is Act 1077 (Representative Daniel) of the 2001 Regular Session.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 49% AGAINST: 51%

(9) Medicaid Trust Fund Investment — A vote for would authorize the state to invest up to 35% of the Medicaid Trust Fund for the Elderly in stocks. A vote against would continue to prohibit the state from investing this fund in stocks.

Act 1232 (Senator Ellington) of the 2001 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14(B). Companion legislation is Act 700 (Senator Schedler) of the 2001 Regular Session.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 49% AGAINST: 51%

(10) Groundwater Conservation — A vote for would create a Drought Protection Trust Fund and allow payments to farmers for not using groundwater in drought conditions. A vote against would continue to prohibit the loan, pledge or donation of public funds to any private person (e.g. farmers).

Act 1233 (Senator Malone) of the 2001 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 10.11. Companion legislation is Act 1025 (Senator Malone) of the 2001 Regular Session.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 46% AGAINST: 54%

(11) Offshore Drilling Rigs Tax Break — A vote for would exempt from local property taxes drilling rigs destined for use outside the state’s territorial waters but stored in the state or undergoing conversion, renovation or repair. A vote against would continue to allow local governments to tax all drilling rigs within their boundaries.
Act 86 (Senator Romero) of the 2002 Regular Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 21 (J).

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 47% AGAINST: 53%

(12) Livingston Parish Coroner — A vote for would allow an incumbent coroner in Livingston Parish, who is not a medical doctor, to run for re-election if a medical doctor also qualifies to run. A vote against would continue to require that a coroner be a medical doctor unless a qualified medical doctor is unwilling to assume the position.

Act 1230 (Senator Fontenot) of the 2001 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 29. Companion legislation is Act 579 (Representative Erdey) of the 2001 Regular Session.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 45% AGAINST: 55% (Livingston Parish VOTE FOR: 54%)

November 7, 2000 Election

(1) Louisiana, Inc. — A vote for would create Louisiana, Inc., a quasi-private, state-funded corporation, exempt from state civil service, as the state’s primary economic development agency. A vote against would continue the existing Department of Economic Development.

Act 153 (Senator Hollis) of the 2000 First Extraordinary Session, Amending Article XII, Section 12.

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 32% AGAINST: 68%

The “Stelly Plan”

Proposed amendments No. 2 and 3 are combined together because neither of the proposals nor the companion legislation becomes effective unless both amendments are approved. One proposal deals with the income tax and the other with the sales tax. The constitution limits an amendment to one object, thus separate amendments were required.

(2) State Personal Income Tax Change
(3) State Food and Utilities Sales Tax Repeal

A vote for both amendments would increase personal income taxes, permanently remove the state sales taxes from food and utilities and dedicate at least 80% of the net new revenues to teacher, faculty and school worker pay raises. A vote against either amendment would continue existing income tax rates and brackets, the deduction for federal income taxes paid and the use of temporary state sales taxes on food and utilities.

Act 48 (Representative Daniel) of the 2000 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 4 (A) and Act 49 (Representative Thompson) of the 2000 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 2.2

FAILED

Amendment #2—VOTE FOR: 38% AGAINST: 62%
Amendment #3—VOTE FOR: 52% AGAINST: 48%
Both amendments failed because both had to pass to become effective.

(4) Donation of Public Funds — A vote for would allow a parish or municipality to loan, pledge or donate certain revenues dedicated to economic development to a person, association or corporation that agrees to locate or expand an industrial operation in the area and hire local residents. A vote against would continue the general prohibition against

Act 152 (Representative Faucheux) of the 2000 First Extraordinary Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 36% AGAINST: 64%

November 20, 1999 Election

(1) Board of Pardons Approval — A vote for would require a favorable recommendation by the Louisiana Board of Pardons before the governor could grant a pardon, commutation, or remittance. A vote against would continue to require a recommendation by the Louisiana Board of Pardons before the governor could grant a pardon, commutation, or remittance.

Act 1401 (Senator Windhorst) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article IV, Section 5 (E) (1)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%

(2) Wildlife Trust Funds — A vote for would allow up to 35% of two wildlife refuge trust funds to be invested in stocks. A vote against would continue the prohibition against investing
Act 1402 (Representative John Smith) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (A) and (B)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 53% AGAINST: 47%

(3) Zachary School District — A vote for would allow the City of Zachary to form its own school district. A vote against would retain Zachary’s schools in the East Baton Rouge Parish
Act 1403 (Representative Travis) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 13 (D)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(4) Workers’ Compensation Corporation, No Sale — A vote for would prevent the sale or dissolution of the Louisiana Workers’ Compensation Corporation (LWCC) once its backing by the full faith and credit of the state expires. A vote against would allow the LWCC to be dissolved or sold to another insurance company.

Act 1404 (Representative DeWitt) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 8.1 (A)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 67% AGAINST: 33%

(5) Workers’ Compensation Corporation, Join LIGA — A vote for would permit the Louisiana Workers’ Compensation Corporation (LWCC) to participate in the Louisiana Insurance Guarantee Association (LIGA). A vote against would continue to prohibit such participation.

Act 1405 (Representative DeWitt) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 8.1 (F)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 67% AGAINST: 33%

(6) Jury Exemption for Elders — A vote for would give persons who are seventy years of age or older the option to accept or decline jury service. A vote against would continue to require such persons to serve unless excused for hardship.

Act 1406 (Representative LeBlanc) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 33 (B)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

October 23, 1999 Election

(1) Legislative Sessions — A vote for would allow legislators to each introduce five non-fiscal bills in fiscal-only sessions, add 15 days to the fiscal-only session, and allow flexibility in scheduling sessions. A vote against would continue to permit consideration of only fiscal issues in regular legislative sessions in even-numbered years.

Act 1391 (Senator Hines) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2 (A)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 46% AGAINST: 54%

(2) Tobacco Trust Fund — A vote for would put at least 75% of the state’s tobacco settlement payments in a permanent trust fund; dedicate the earnings to TOPS, local school districts and health programs; and spend the other 25% annually on health and education. It would also allow the Legislature by two-thirds vote to put 100% of the settlement proceeds in a trust fund with the earnings dedicated to TOPS, local schools and health programs. A vote against would allow 100% of the payments to be spent each year subject only to statutory dedications.

Act 1392 (Representative Downer) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 10.8, 10.9, and 10.10

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

(3) Biennial State Budgeting — A vote for would give the state the option to adopt a two-year budgeting process in the future if desired by the Legislature. A vote against would maintain the requirement that the state budget on an annual basis.

Act 1393 (Representative LeBlanc) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 16 (A); Article IV, Section 5 (G) (2); Article VII, Sections 10 (B) and (C) (1), 10.1 (C) (1), 10.4 (A) (1), 10.5 (C), 11 (A) and (C), and 27 (B); Article VIII, Sections 7.1 (D) and 13 (B); and Article X, Sections 13 (A) and 51. Repeals Act 1489 of the 1997 Regular Session

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 36% AGAINST: 64%

(4) Supplemental Pay — A vote for would allow supplemental pay for law enforcement officers of state agencies who patrol levees, bridges, waterways and riverfronts. A vote against would continue to provide for payment of such officers exclusively by their agencies according to the state civil service pay plan.

Act 1394 (Senator Heitmeier) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 10 (A) (1)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 46% AGAINST: 54%

(5) Donation of Surplus Property — A vote for would allow the donation of movable surplus property among local agencies with public safety functions. A vote against would continue the general prohibition against such donations.

Act 1395 (Representative Smith) of the 1999 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 14 (E)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(6) Donation of Asphalt — A vote for would allow the state to donate asphalt removed from state highways to parish and municipal governing authorities. A vote against would continue to prohibit the state from donating things of value.

Act 1396 (Senator Cain) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%

(7) Higher Education Funding — A vote for would prohibit the reduction of state funding for a college or university for four years when a community college begins offering classes in the same or neighboring parish. A vote against would not protect such institutions from budget cuts due to enrollment losses after the 2001-2002 school year.

Act 1397 (Representative Triche) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 7.1 (D)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 43% AGAINST: 57%

(8) First-Time Felon Pardons — A vote for would limit the automatic pardon for first-time felons to only people convicted of non-violent or other less serious crimes. A vote against would continue the practice of giving automatic pardons to all first-time offenders regardless of the crime.

Act 1398 (Senator Malone) of the 1999 Regular Session, Amending Article IV, Section 5 (E) (1)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

(9) North Rapides Parish School District — A vote for would remove from the constitution the authorization for Wards 9, 10, and 11 in Rapides Parish to form its own school district. A vote against would retain in the constitution the authorization for Wards 9, 10, and 11 in Rapides Parish to form a separate school district.

Act 1399 (Senator Dyess) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 13 (D)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%
(10) Orleans Blighted Property — A vote for would expand the property tax assessment freeze program to include officially declared blighted residential property 40 years old or older located anywhere in Orleans Parish that is renovated for residential use. A vote against would continue the current property tax assessment freeze program that applies only to rehabilitated property in a downtown, historic or economic development district.

Act 1400 (Representative Murray) of the 1999 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (H)

November 3, 1998 Election

(1) Rename Board of Trustees — A vote for would change the name of the Board of Trustees for State Colleges and Universities to the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System. A vote against would keep the current name.

Act 168 (Senator Dardenne) of the 1998 First Extraordinary Session, amending Article VIII, Section 6 (A)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 66% AGAINST: 34%

(2) Board of Regents Membership — A vote for would provide a method of appointing Board of Regents members that would accommodate any change in the number of congressional districts. A vote against would continue a constitutional requirement that cannot be met with the present number of districts.

Act 169 (Senator Dardenne) of the 1998 First Extraordinary Session, amending Article VIII, Section 5 (B)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 60% AGAINST: 40%

October 3, 1998 Election

(1) Community College System — A vote for would create a new Louisiana Community and Technical College System and management board under the Board of Regents. A vote against would leave the technical colleges under the Board of Elementary and Secondary and the community colleges under their current higher education management boards.

Act 170 (Senator Dardenne) of the 1998 First Extraordinary Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.1 (C) (2) through (4), (D) (1) (c); Article VIII, Section 3 (A), 5 (A), (D), (D) (3), (4) and (5), and (E); adding Article VIII, Section 7.1

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 66% AGAINST: 34%

(2) Parish Severance Tax Allocation — A vote for would raise to $750,000 the maximum amount of oil and gas severance tax money a parish government could receive from the state each year. A vote against would retain the present $500,000 limit.
Act 1499 (Representative Dupre) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 4 (D)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 52% AGAINST: 48%
(3) Charity Hospital Oversight — A vote for would grant the Legislature constitutional authority to pass laws providing for the supervision, operation and management of the charity hospitals by the Board of Regents or higher education management boards, including laws to provide for legislative approval or disapproval of related rules. A vote against would leave oversight of the hospitals with the LSU Board of Supervisors.

Act 1488 (Representative Riddle) of the 1997 Regular Session, adding Article VIII, Section 16

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%

(4) Crime Victims’ Rights — A vote for would add the rights of crime victims in criminal proceedings to the constitution. A vote against would continue statutory provisions specifying crime victims’ rights.

Act 1487 (Senator Dardenne) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article I, adding Section 25

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 69% AGAINST: 31%

(5) “Rainy Day” Fund and Uses of Nonrecurring Money — A vote for would redesign the state’s “rainy day” fund and expand the purposes for which nonrecurring state revenue could be used. A vote against would retain the current fund, in which money has never been deposited, and continue to limit the use of nonrecurring revenue to pay off state debt early.

Act 1501 (Representative Downer) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 10 (B) and (D) (2) and 10.3

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(6) Bail Denial — A vote for would add violent crimes and felony drug offenses as constitutional exceptions to a person’s right to reasonable bail. A vote against would retain capital offenses as the only constitutional exception to a person’s right to reasonable bail.

Act 1498 (Representative Bruneau) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 18

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 68% AGAINST: 32%

(7) State Infrastructure Bank — A vote for would allow public funds, including Transportation Trust Fund money, to be loaned to public or private entities through an infrastructure bank to help finance capital improvement projects. A vote against would leave in serious question the ability of the bank to loan public or to use the trust fund money.

Act 1490 (Senator Ewing) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 49% AGAINST: 51%

(8) Homestead Assessment for Seniors — A vote for would freeze the property tax assessment on homes of persons over 65 years of age with incomes of $50,000 or less. A vote against would continue to treat seniors the same as other homeowners.

Act 1491 (Senator Lentini) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 18 (A) and adding Section 18 (G)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 69% AGAINST: 31%

(9) Felon in Public Office — A vote for would constitutionally prohibit a convicted felon from seeking or holding elective or appointed public office and would restore that right if pardoned or 15 years after the sentence is completed. A vote against would continue the statutory prohibition against a convicted felon holding elective office unless pardoned.

Act 1492 (Senator Malone) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 10

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%

(10) Court-Ordered Taxes — A vote for would prohibit any court in the state from ordering a state or local tax levy, tax increase or the repeal of a tax exemption. A vote against would continue to vest the power to tax in the Legislature and certain local governments with no specific prohibition against court-ordered taxes.

Act 1493 (Senator Heitmeier) of the 1997 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 1 (B)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 62% AGAINST: 38%

(11) State Sovereignty — A vote for would add a statement to the Constitution declaring Louisiana a sovereign state. A vote against means such a statement would not be added to the Constitution.

Act 1494 (Senator Jordan) of the 1997 Regular Session, adding Article I, Section 25

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(12) Millage Roll Up Hearing Notice — A vote for would require notice of a hearing to roll up a property tax millage (which was previously adjusted down due to reassessment) to be published twice at least 30 days prior to the hearing. A vote against would continue the single, 24-hour notice required by the open meetings law for all public meetings.

Act 1496 (Representative Schneider) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section (C)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%

(13) Flood Emergency Funding — A vote for would allow the Interim Emergency Board to appropriate or borrow money to deal with impending floods. A vote against would mean the board would continue to be able to appropriate or borrow money only after a flood.

Act 1500 (Representative Jack Smith) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 7 (B)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(14) Jury Requirements — A vote for would require a unanimous decision in a criminal case with a six-member jury and could allow certain crimes to be combined in one jury trial. A vote against would retain an “unconstitutional” six-member jury voting requirement and continue to prevent the combining of crimes with different jury requirements into one trial.

Act 1502 (Senator Lentini) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 17

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 62% AGAINST: 38%

(15) Blighted Property — A vote for would allow local governments to forgive back taxes owed on blighted property renovated by a purchaser or blighted property sold by an owner for less than the appraised value and then renovated. A vote against would continue to require that back taxes be paid when property is sold.

Act 75 (Senator Bagneris) of the 1998 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 53% AGAINST: 47%

(16) Downtown Residential Property — A vote for would allow a property tax assessment freeze for up to 15 years on property developed for residential use within a downtown district. A vote against would continue to allow such a freeze for only 10 years after completion of the development.

Act 76 (Senator Malone) of the 1998 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (H)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 49% AGAINST: 51%

(17) Property Tax Sale — A vote for would allow property in New Orleans to be sold at a tax sale for less than the minimum required bid if it failed to sell at a prior sale. A vote against would continue to require a minimum bid equal to the taxes due plus any interest.

Act 1495 (Representative Murray) of the 1997 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 25 (A)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 52% AGAINST: 48% (Orleans Parish VOTE FOR: 49%)

(18) Vidalia Property Tax Exemption — A vote for would allow the Town of Vidalia to exempt most property owners from municipal property tax. A vote against would require Vidalia to continue to tax property in the same manner as other municipalities.

Act 74 (Representative Hammett) of the 1998 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (J)

FAILED—VOTE FOR: 42% AGAINST: 58% (City of Vidalia VOTE FOR: 73%)

November 5, 1996 Election

(1) Part-Time Officials’ Retirement — A vote for would prohibit participation in public retirement systems by legislators, school board members and other part-time public officials initially elected or appointed after January 1, 1997. A vote against would continue to allow part-time officials to join public retirement systems.

Act 99 (Representative Thompson) of the 1996 First Extraordinary Session, adding Article X, Section 29.1

PASSED—VOTE FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

(2) Donation of Abandoned Housing — A vote for would allow parishes and municipalities to donate abandoned or blighted housing to nonprofit groups for renovation. A vote against would continue the general ban on donations of publicly-owned property.

Act 97 (Senator Robichaux) of the 1996 First Extraordinary Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

PASSED—FOR: 70% AGAINST 30%

(3) Sales Tax Exemptions—Local, State or Both — A vote for would ratify the current practice of applying different sales tax exemptions at the state and local levels. A vote against would continue the constitutional requirement that exemptions apply uniformly to both state and local sales taxes.

Act 46 (Senator Hainkel) of the 1996 Regular Session, amending Article VI, Section 29 (D)

PASSED—FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%

September 21 1996 Election

(1) Local Voter Approval of New Gambling — A vote for would require the approval of a majority of voters in a parish before certain new gambling could be conducted there. In addition, a vote for would allow the Legislature to provide, by local or special law, for elections on propositions relating to allowing or prohibiting one or more forms of gambling authorized by legislative act. A vote against would continue to allow new gambling in a parish without the constitutional requirement of local approval and would continue to prohibit the Legislature from calling local elections on gambling through local or special laws.

Act 98 (Representative Windhorst) of the 1996 First Extraordinary Session, adding Article XII, Section 6 (C)

PASSED—FOR: 73% AGAINST: 27%

(2) Intangible Property Exemption — A vote for would make constitutional the long-standing practice of exempting certain intangible business property such as “goodwill” from the property tax, with limited exceptions. A vote against would leave intangible property subject to potential taxation.

Act 47 (Senator Greene) of the 1996 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 21 (C) (18)

PASSED—FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

November 18, 1995 Election

(1) Jury Instruction — A vote for would allow the Legislature to require the court to instruct a criminal jury that the governor is authorized to reduce sentences and grant pardons. A vote against would continue to prevent judges from advising jurors of the governor’s power to alter sentences.

Act 1322 (Representative Windhorst) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 16

PASSED—FOR: 60% AGAINST 40%

October 21, 1995 Election

(1) Abolish Forced Heirship — A vote for would abolish forced heirship in Louisiana, except when a child is younger than 24 or is mentally or physically disabled and unable to care for himself. A vote against would retain the requirement that a portion of a parent’s estate be reserved for the children.

Act 1321 (Representative Brun and Senator Barro) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 5

PASSED—FOR: 68% AGAINST: 32%

(2) Term Limits for Legislators — A vote for would limit legislators to three consecutive terms in the house in which they serve. A vote against would continue unlimited terms for legislators.

Act 1326 (Representative Vitter) of the 1995 Regular Session, adding Article III, Section 4 (E)

PASSED—FOR: 76% AGAINST 24%

(3) State and Local Liability Limit — A vote for would allow the Legislature to limit the awards in lawsuits against the state or local governments. A vote against would continue to allow the courts alone to determine the amount of such damages.

Act 1328 (Representative Ackal) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 10 (C)

PASSED—FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%

(4) Mandatory Retirement for Judges — A vote for would raise the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75. A vote against would continue to require judges to retire at age 70.

Act 1317 (Representative Murray) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 23 (B)

FAILED—FOR: 38% AGAINST: 62%

(5) Baker and Rapides Parish School Districts — A vote for would allow the City of Baker and Wards 9, 10, and 11 in Rapides Parish to form their own school districts. A vote against would retain parish-wide school districts in East Baton Rouge and Rapides parishes.

Act 1323 (Senator Cross) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 13 (D)

PASSED—FOR: 64% AGIANST:36%
(6) Two-thirds Vote for Fees — A vote for would require two-thirds approval by each house of the Legislature to enact or increase a state fee or civil fine. A vote against would continue to allow the Legislature, by majority vote, to enact or raise fees and fines or authorize state agencies to do so.

Act 1324 (Representatives Gunn and Jenkins) of the 1995 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 2.1

PASSED—FOR: 62% AGAINST: 38%

(7) Limit Local Tax Votes — A vote for would limit a local tax proposition to one election in a six month period, unless the taxing body declares an emergency. A vote against would continue to allow a tax proposal to be resubmitted within six months.

Act 1329 (Senator Bean and Representative Jenkins) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 30

PASSED—FOR: 69% AGAINST: 31%

(8) Local Hunting or Fishing Laws — A vote for would allow the Legislature to enact local hunting and fishing laws that apply to only parts of the state. A vote against would continue to prohibit such laws.

Act 1318 (Representatives Roach and Patti) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 12 (C)

FAILED—FOR: 43% AGAINST: 57%

(9) Mineral Rights of Restored Coastal Lands — A vote for would allow the state to relinquish to previous owners mineral rights of coastal land it restores. A vote against would continue to require the state to retain such mineral rights.

Act 1332 (Senator Nunez) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article IX, Section 4 (A)

PASSED—FOR: 61% AGAINST: 33%

(10) Mineral Revenue Fund Use — A vote for would limit the use of monies in the Mineral Revenue Audit and Settlement Fund to early repayment of state debt. A vote against would continue to allow some uses that may not result in early debt reduction.

Act 1325 (Representative Stine) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.5 (C)

PASSED—FOR: 67% AGAINST: 33%

(11) Oilfield Site Restoration Fund — A vote for would constitutionally protect the existing Oilfield Site Restoration Fund. A vote against would retain the Fund statutorily, subject to legislative change.

Act 1330 (Senator Nunez and Representative Jenkins) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.6

PASSED—FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%

(12) Oil Spill Contingency Fund — A vote for would constitutionally protect the existing Oil Spill Contingency Fund. A vote against would retain the Fund in the statutes, subject to legislative change.

Act 1331 (Senator Nunez and Representative Jenkins) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.6

PASSED—FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%

(13) Veterans’ Civil Service Preference Points — A vote for would allow the Legislature to determine which military conflicts qualify veterans for civil service preference points. A vote against would retain the need for a constitutional amendment to add a conflict.

Act 1327 (Representative Downer) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 10 (A) (2)

PASSED—FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

(14) Redeeming New Orleans Property — A vote for would reduce from three years to 18 months the time allowed an original owner to redeem abandoned or blighted property sold at tax sales by the City of New Orleans. A vote against would continue to allow the original owners three years to reclaim such property.

Act 1319 (Representative Clarkson and Senator Bagneris) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 25 (B)

PASSED—FOR: 66% AGAINST: 34% (Orleans Parish VOTE FOR: 75%)
(15) Donating Abandoned Homes — A vote for would allow the City of New Orleans to donate abandoned and blighted housing to nonprofit groups for renovation. A vote against would continue the general ban on donations of publicly-owned property.

Act 1320 (Representative Clarkson and Senator Irons) of the 1995 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)
PASSED—FOR: 68% AGAINST: 32% (Orleans Parish VOTE FOR: 75%)

October 1, 1994 Election

(1) Investing the Education Trust Fund — A vote for would allow the state treasurer to invest up to 35% of the permanent Education Quality Trust Fund in stocks. A vote against would continue the ban on using any state money to purchase stock.

Act 151 (Senator Nunez) of the 1994 Third Extraordinary Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.1 (A), (B), and (C) (2)

PASSED—FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%

(2) Louisiana Recovery District — A vote for would prohibit the Louisiana Recovery District (LRD) from incurring new debt, issuing bonds, levying a new tax or increasing an existing tax; ensure that the district terminates by June 30, 1999; and require a two-thirds vote of each house of the Legislature to allow any future statewide special district to levy a tax or incur debt for the state. A vote against would continue to allow the Legislature, by majority vote, to authorize the LRD, or similar statewide entities, to issue bonds or raise taxes for state use.

Act 48 (Representative Steve Theriot and Senator Foster) of the 1994 Regular Session, adding Article VI, Section 30.1

PASSED—FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%

(3) Juveniles Tried as Adults — A vote for would expand the constitutional list of serious crimes for which the Legislature may require juveniles to be prosecuted and punished as adults. A vote against may leave in question the Legislature’s authority to expand the list of crimes for which juveniles must be treated as adults.

Act 152 (Representative Windhorst and Senator Barro) of the 1994 Third Extraordinary Session, amending Article V, Section 19

PASSED—FOR: 74% AGAINST: 26%

(4) Family Court Jurisdiction — A vote for would authorize the Legislature to give family courts jurisdiction in property settlements resulting from divorce or annulment of marriage. A vote against would continue to have divorce cases decided in family court and the related property settlements decided in district court.

Act 1040 (Senator Bankston) of the 1993 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 16 (A)

PASSED—FOR: 67% AGAINST: 33%

October 16, 1993 Election

(1) Legislative Sessions — A vote for would mandate shorter, fiscal-only legislative sessions in alternate years; limit to five the number of bills a legislator could introduce once a session begins; alter deadlines for bill prefiling and introduction, and final adjournment; and leave a session’s final days for concurrence and conference committee reports. A vote against would continue the current structure of annual 85-day general sessions.

Act 1041 (Senator Kelly) of the 1993 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2 (A)

PASSED—FOR: 66% AGAINST: 34%

(2) State Debt Limit — A vote for would give constitutional status to a debt reduction plan that would limit state borrowing so that by fiscal 2003-04, no more than 6% of state revenues would be spent annually on debt service payments. A vote against would retain this debt reduction plan (enacted in 1993) in the statutes, subject to change by majority legislative vote.

Act 1044 (Senator Johnson) of the 1993 Regular Session, amending Article VII by adding Section 6 (F)

PASSED—FOR: 71% AGAINST: 29%

(3) Feasibility Studies/Spending Limit — A vote for would require feasibility studies for all capital outlay projects and specify those revenues to be included in calculating the state expenditure limit. A vote against would allow capital outlay projects to be budgeted without feasibility studies and leave in question the revenues to be included in the expenditure limit calculation.

Act 1045 (Representative Steve Theriot) of the 1993 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 10 (C), 11 (A) and (C); and adding Section 10 (J)

PASSED—FOR: 71% AGAINST: 29%

(4) Nonrecurring Revenues — A vote for would stop the use of nonrecurring revenues for recurring expenses by limiting their use to early payment of state debt. A vote against would leave a similar statutory limit, effective beginning in fiscal 1994-95, subject to change by majority legislative vote.

Act 1042 (Senator Hainkel) of the 1993 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 10 (B) and (D)

PASSED—FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

(5) Agency Debt Costs — A vote for would require that debt service payments for capital improvements be reported in the governor’s proposed state budget by budget unit. A vote against would leave the method of reporting debt service to the discretion of the governor and the Legislature.

Act 1043 (Senator McPherson) of the 1993 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 6 (B)

PASSED—FOR: 72% AGAINST: 28%

(6) Mobile Home Tax Exemption — A vote for would extend the constitutional homestead exemption to owner-occupied mobile homes and other residences located on land owned by others. A vote against would continue a statutory property tax credit, similar to a homestead exemption for such homes.

Act 1046 (Representative Stelly) of the 1993 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 20 (A) (1)

PASSED—FOR: 59% AGAINST 41%

November 3, 1992 Election

(1) Investment of 8(g) Fund in Stocks — A vote for would allow the state treasurer to invest a portion of the permanent Education Quality Trust Fund in stocks. A vote against would continue the ban on stock purchases.

Act 1146 (Representative Reilly) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.1 (B)

FAILED—FOR: 46% AGAINST: 54%

(2) Use of Public Funds — A vote for would specifically authorize the state and local governments to invest, grant or loan public funds for economic development under programs enacted by a two-thirds vote. A vote against would continue questions regarding the constitutionality of existing financial assistance programs for business development.

Act 1145 (Representative Reilly) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

FAILED—FOR: 42% AGAINST: 58%

(3) Limited Constitutional Convention — A vote for would give the Legislature explicit authority to call a constitutional convention limited to a specified constitutional provision, article or articles. A vote against would leave unsure the Legislature’s authority to call a limited convention.

Act 1148 (Senator Kelly) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article XIII, Section 2.1

FAILED—FOR: 39% AGAINST: 61%

(4) Lottery Dedication for Health Insurance — A vote for would constitutionally dedicate $5 million in lottery funds each year to a health insurance program for uninsurable persons. A vote against would require the program to depend on annual state appropriations.

Act 1147 (Representative Sittig) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 6 (A)

FAILED—FOR: 44% AGAINST: 56%

(5) BESE Membership — A vote for would decrease BESE’s membership from 11 to nine by having members elected from seven congressional rather than eight single-member districts and eliminating one gubernatorial appointment to the board. A vote against would retain BESE’s present membership structure.

Act 1143 (Representative Deville) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 3 (B)

FAILED—FOR: 42% AGAINST: 58%

(6) Family Court Jurisdiction — A vote for would authorize the Legislature to give family courts jurisdiction in property settlements resulting from divorce or annulment of a marriage. A vote against would continue the present situation in which a family court cannot decide such property settlements.

Act 1144 (Representative McMains) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 16 (A)

FAILED—FOR: 46% AGAINST: 54%

(7) Additional Amendment

The August 1992 Louisiana Constitutional Convention, which was limited to fiscal matters, adopted a single proposal to be voted on November 3, 1992. The amendment would make the following changes.

The vote on the entire Louisiana Constitutional Convention of 1992 amendment:

General Obligation Debt

Limit the issuance of new general obligation (G.O.) state debt for five years. The state could sell up to 90% of the amount of G.O. bonds retired in fiscal 1993-94; the percentage would fall 5% a year to 70% in fiscal 1997-98. The Legislature could exceed the limit, by a two-thirds vote, but only to deal with an extraordinary emergency. The Legislature would have: to adopt a comprehensive debt management plan by the end of 1993.

Amend Article VII by adding Section 6 (F)

Nonrecurring Revenues

Restrict the use of nonrecurring state revenues. Nonrecurring revenues would be designated each year by the Revenue Estimating Conference and could be appropriated only for capital outlay or for expenses determined by the Legislature to be extraordinary and nonrecurring.

Amend Article VII, Section 10 (B) and add Section 10 (D) (2)

Statutory Dedications

Require a two-thirds vote of the Legislature, rather than a simple majority, to dedicate state revenues.

Amend Article VII, Section 9 (B)

State Expenditure Limit
Define the funds to be included in determining the state spending limit and require a specific legislative vote to change the limit.

Amend Article VII, by adding Sections (10) (C) (2), (3) and (4); and (10) (J)

Budget Reduction Authority

Allow cuts of up to 10% in mandatory expenditures and the use of up to 10% of dedicated funds to balance the budget for a year in which revenues are forecast to drop, or during the year when a deficit is projected. The Transportation Trust Fund would be exempt.

Amend Article VII, by adding Section 11.1

Constitutional Amendment Procedure

Allow the Legislature to propose a single constitutional amendment that would amend one or more articles but only in regard to state revenue dedications, expenditure mandates for the: use of state funds, or the processes for adjusting state revenues or expenditures. The Transportation Trust Fund would be exempt.

Amend Article XIII, Section 1 (B)

Feasibility Study for Capital Outlay Projects

Require each capital improvement project, before inclusion in the state capital budget, to be evaluated through a feasibility study.

Amend Article VII, Section 6 (B)

Capital Budget Priorities

Require those capital outlay requests, to be implemented in the first year of the five-year capital outlay program, be put in priority order based on an evaluation of the feasibility studies.

Amend Article VII, Section 11 (C)

Industrial Tax Exemption Job Criteria

Require the Board of Commerce and Industry to consider evidence of job creation or retention, as provided by law, when granting industrial tax exemptions.

Amend Article VII, by adding Section 21 (F) (1) (b)

Local Sales Tax Exemptions

Require a two-thirds vote of the Legislature, rather than a simple majority, to add or change exemptions from local sales taxes.

Amend Article VI, Section 29 (D)

Local Occupational License Tax

Clarify the provision on local occupational license taxes by removing reference to a repealed state tax.

Amend Article VI, Section 28

Local Government Scholarships

Give local governments authority to use public funds for scholarships to attend postsecondary institutions in Louisiana.

Amend Article VII, Section 14 (B)

The Entire Louisiana Constitutional Convention of 1992 amendment

FAILED—FOR: 38% AGAINST: 62%

October 3, 1992 Election

(1) Home Builders’ Property Tax Exemption — A vote for would exempt from property taxes the value of new residential improvements for two years unless sold or occupied. A vote against would continue to make developers and home builders liable for taxes on the full assessed value of residential improvements completed but not sold nor occupied.

Act 1138 (Senator Crain) of the 1992 Regular Session, adding Article VII, Section 21 (J)

FAILED—FOR: 38% AGAINST: 62%

(2) Homestead Exemption for Mobile Homes — A vote for would apply the homestead exemption to mobile homes on rented land. A vote against would continue to allow owner-occupied mobile homes on rented land to be taxed on their full assessed value.

Act 1141 (Senator Crain) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 20 (A) (1)

FAILED—FOR: 50% AGAINST: 50%

(3) Regents’ Membership — A vote for would set Board of Regents’ membership at two members from each congressional district, with one member appointed at large. A vote against would make it impossible for Regents to meet its constitutional requirement of no more than two members per congressional district.

Act 1140 (Senator Bankston) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 5 (B)

FAILED—FOR: 47% AGAINST: 53%

(4) Effective Date of Laws — A vote for would fix August 15 as the effective date for laws enacted during a regular legislative session. A vote against would continue to have all laws become effective 60 days following adjournment.

Act 1139 (Senator Kelly) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 19

PASSED—FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(5) Title to Certain Terrebonne Parish Land — A vote for would allow the ownership of land in Terrebonne Parish to be transferred to those persons who have possessed the property as owners in good faith for 10 years or more, with the mineral rights reserved to the Terrebonne Parish School Board. A vote against would allow the Terrebonne Parish School Board to claim ownership.

Act 1142 (Senator Foster) of the 1992 Regular Session, amending Article IX, Section 4

PASSED—FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

October 19, 1991 Election

(1) State Mandates on Locals — A vote for would further limit the state in mandating increased spending by local governments without their consent or unless funding were provided. A vote against would continue to allow the state to mandate increased local spending for many purposes.

Act 1066 (Representative Thompson) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article VI, Section 14

PASSED—FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%

(2) Use of Public Funds — A vote for would allow public funds to be used for programs to promote education or economic development and thus permit a planned expansion of state financial assistance for business development. A vote against would retain the prohibition on donating or loaning public funds.

Act 1067 (Senator Ewing) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

FAILED—FOR: 48% AGAINST: 52%

(3) Regents’ Membership and Authority — A vote for would reduce membership of the Board of Regents from 15 to 13, make Regents’ authority to coordinate and plan public higher education more specific, and give Regents authority to name campuses and facilities. A vote against would continue Regents’ present membership and authority.

Act 1068 (Representative John Smith) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 5 (B) and adding Section 5 (D) (6) and (7)

FAILED—FOR: 47% AGAINST: 53%

(4) New Fund for Higher Education — A vote for would create the Higher Education Louisiana Partnership (HELP) Fund to expand state challenge grants for private donations. A vote against would not create the new fund.

Act 1069 (Representative Reilly) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 10.4

PASSED—FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%

(5) Mineral Settlement Money — A vote for would require that any payments above $5 million the state received from settlements or court decisions on underpaid mineral revenues would be used to reduce state debt. A vote against would place such windfalls in the state general fund and/or the Revenue Stabilization/Mineral Trust Fund, depending on the amount of the windfalls and the amount of total state mineral revenues.

Act 1070 (Representative Stine) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article VII by adding Section 10.4

PASSED—FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

(6) State Workers’ Compensation Fund — A vote for would allow the creation of a state-backed, private, nonprofit corporation to assure the availability of workers’ compensation insurance. A vote against would require employers to rely on the present insurance system until an alternative solution is developed.

Act 1073 (Senator Foster) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article XII, adding Section 8.1

PASSED—FOR: 58% AGAINST: 42%

(7) Single Parish Sales Tax Collector — A vote for would require a single local sales tax collector in each parish. A vote against would continue to allow each local taxing body the option of collecting its own sales tax or voluntarily consolidating collection.

Act 1072 (Representative Reilly) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 3

PASSED—FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

(8) Notice of Local/Special Bills — A vote for would allow an option to prefile rather than advertise local and special bills prior to introduction. A vote against would continue to require public notice of all local and special bills prior to introduction through advertising.

Act 1071 (Representative Morrell) of the 1991 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 13

FAILED—FOR: 39% AGAINST: 61%

October 6, 1990 Election

(1) Regular Legislative Sessions — A vote for would start regular legislative sessions three weeks earlier and end them before a new budget year begins. A vote against would continue to allow regular sessions to run into a new fiscal year.

Act 1095 (Senator Osterberger) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2 (A)

PASSED—FOR: 78% AGAINST: 22%

(2) State Budget Controls — A vote for would limit state spending growth, mandate procedures for a balanced state budget, prevent cumulative deficits, create a Revenue Stabilization/Mineral Trust Fund, and protect the Revenue Estimating Conference concept. A vote against would continue to give the governor and Legislature discretion in dea1ing with these budget issues.

Act 1096 (Senator Ewing) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Sections 10 and 11 and adding Section 10.3

PASSED—FOR: 71% AGAINST: 29%

(3) Education Trust Fund — A vote for would (1) direct the Legislature to regulate and approve education trust fund spending for administrative costs and (2) prevent such funds from replacing other state financing of elementary-secondary programs. A vote against would continue to let the Legislature decide on use of education trust fund money for these purposes.

Act 846 (Representative Dastugue) of the 1989 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10.1 (C)

PASSED—FOR: 72% AGAINST: 28%

(4) State Lottery — A vote for would authorize the creation and operation of a state lottery. A vote against would continue to prohibit a state or local lottery.

Act 1097 (Senator Hollis) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article XII, Section 6

PASSED—FOR: 69% AGAINST: 31%

(5) Workers’ Compensation — A vote for would assure continued use of administrative hearing officers to resolve disputed workers’ compensation claims. A vote against would return resolution of disputes to the district courts if the hearing officer process is finally ruled unconstitutional.

Act 1098 (Senator Ewing) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article V, Sections 10 (A), (B) and 16 (A)

PASSED—FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%

(6) State Police Commission — A vote for would create a separate civil service system for state police. A vote against would retain state police under the existing state civil service for classified employees.

Act 1106 (Representative Bella) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article X, Sections 1 (A) and 10 (A) (1), and adding part IV

PASSED—FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(7) Supplemental Pay — A vote for would repeal provisions allowing supplemental pay to state police and enforcement officers in the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. A vote against would continue authority to supplement pay of these officers.

Act 848 (Representative Downer) of the 1989 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 10 (A) (1)

PASSED—FOR: 53% AGAINST: 47%

(8) College Stock Acquisition — A vote for would permit public colleges and universities to acquire stock in a company that uses its research. A vote against would continue to prohibit such stock acquisition.

Act 1099 (Senator Swearingen) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

PASSED—FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(9) Local Inheritance Tax — A vote for would prohibit local governments from levying inheritance taxes. A vote against would continue to permit local inheritance taxes under home rule authority or if authorized by law.

Act 1100 (Representative Forster) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 4 (C)

PASSED—FOR: 72% AGAINST: 28%

(10) Wholesale Inventory Tax Exemption — A vote for would permit local option property tax exemptions on a wholesaler’s inventory. A vote against would continue property taxes on all business inventories.

Act 1101 (Representative Leblanc) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 21 (I)

PASSED—FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%

(11) Tax Break for Improvements — A vote for would allow a five-year renewal of the property tax freeze for owners who expand or improve buildings in historic, downtown or economic development districts. A vote against would retain the existing five-year tax freeze.

Act 1104 (Representative Landrieu) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (H)

PASSED—FOR: 55% AGAINST: 45%

(12) Tax Break for Housing Homeless — A vote for would give a property tax exemption to owners who lease buildings to nonprofit agencies to house the homeless. A vote against would require owners to continue paying property taxes on such loaned housing.

Act 845 (Representative Dastugue) of the 1989 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (B) (1)

PASSED—FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%

(13) New Orleans Property Tax — A vote for would allow the New Orleans City Council to levy an additional property tax of up to five mills for fire protection and up to five mills for police service without homestead exemption. A vote against would continue to require any added city millages to be homestead exempt and voter approved.

Act 1103 (Representative Landrieu) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VI, adding Section 26 (E)

PASSED—FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(14) Donations for Industry — A vote for would allow local governments to donate, loan or pledge proceeds from taxes dedicated to economic development to private entities who agree to create jobs in the community. A vote against would continue to prohibit such donations.

Act 1102 (Representative Accardo) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 14 (E)

FAILED

(15) Lignite Tax Dedication — A vote for would dedicate more severance tax on lignite to the parish government where mined. A vote against would let the state keep more of the tax.

Act 1105 (Representative Salter) of the 1990 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 4 (D)

PASSED—FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%

October 7, 1989 Election

(1) Transportation Fund — A vote for would create a transportation trust fund and dedicate to it by FY 1991-92 all of the current 16 cents a gallon gasoline/motor fuel taxes for highways and related purposes; trigger an added four-cent tax to finance a four-lane highway (TIME) program to link urban areas and improve the New Orleans port and airport, and ban a state sales tax on gasoline/motor fuel. A vote against would continue to let the governor and Legislature decide amounts appropriated for highways, and how much consumers pay in state sales tax on gasoline/motor fuel.

Act 847 (Representative Dastugue) of the 1989 Regular Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 27

PASSED—FOR: 71% AGAINST: 29%

(2) Wetlands Fund — A vote for would dedicate at least $5 million a year in state mineral revenue to finance a program to conserve and restore Louisiana’s wetlands. A vote against would continue a similar new statutory dedication.

Act 24 (Senator Bagert) of the 1989 Second Special Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 10.2

PASSED—FOR: 71% AGAINST: 29%

(3) Tax-Exempt Inventory — A vote for would allow the state to grant property tax exemptions for up to 15 years on inventories of new and expanding manufacturing and wholesale distribution firms. A vote against would continue to tax inventories.

Act 26 (Representative Alario) of the 1989 Second Special Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 21 (I)

FAILED

(4) Drug Property Seizure — A vote for would make it easier for Louisiana law enforcement agencies to seize and dispose of property related to illegal drug trafficking. A vote against would retain present strong constitutional property rights.

Act 840 (Senator Decuir) of the 1989 Regular Session, amending Article I, Section 4

RESULTS

(10) Municipal Property Tax — A vote for would allow municipal governments to levy an added general purpose property tax of up to seven mills without further voter approval. A vote against would continue to require that municipal tax increases above the current general purpose millage limit be approved individually by the voters.

Act 27 (Representative Melancon) of the 1989 Second Special Session, amending Article VI, Section 27 (C) and adding Section 27 (D)

FAILED

(11) Auto License Tax — A vote for would mean owners of private cars would pay at least $7 a year more for their license tag, with the tax money dedicated to highways. A vote against would keep the $3 undedicated tax.

Act 28 (Representative Sittig) of the 1989 Second Special Session, amending Article VII, Section 5

PASSED—FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(12) Tax Break for Improvements — A vote for would extend for another five years the present property tax assessment freeze for owners who expand or improve buildings in historic, downtown or economic development districts. A vote against would retain the existing five-year tax incentive.

Act 29 (Representative Landrieu) of the 1989 Second Special Session, amending Article VII, Section 2 (H)

FAILED

(13) Lignite Tax Allocation — A vote for would allocate to the parish government where lignite coal is mined a greater portion of the severance tax. A vote against would let the state keep more of the tax.

Act 30 (Representative Salter) of the 1989 Second Special Session, amending Article VII, Section 4 (D)

FAILED

April 29, 1989 Election

THE AMENDMENT WOULD:

Add, amend and repeal constitutional provisions relating to state and local taxes and to budget and fiscal procedures. In addition to the constitutional changes listed below, approval would trigger implementation of other legislation enacted which is contingent on passage of this proposed amendment.

State Taxes

Remove personal income tax rates, allow the Legislature to set them, but retain the 6% maximum rate and deductibility of federal taxes.

Establish a 6% maximum rate for corporate income taxes in lieu of the 8% set by law, and permit repeal of deductibility of federal taxes.

Remove the $3 private auto license tax rate and let the Legislature determine rates.

Lower the authorized state property tax from 5.75 to l mill.

Local Taxes

Authorize local school boards, parishes and municipalities to reinstate, without voter approval their maximum constitutional millages which were lowered due to reassessment. Increase the school board maximum constitutional millage levied without voter approval from 5 to 5.5 mills, but allow boards with higher adjusted millages to retain them.

Authorize local school boards to levy property taxes with voter approval which are not subject to present legislative restriction as to amount, purpose and duration.

Let fire protection districts levy property taxes without homestead exemption if local voters approve.

Remove homestead exemption for certain New Orleans city taxes.

Repeal the requirement that local occupational license tax rates cannot exceed the state rate. Allow the Legislature to set local rates with a two-thirds vote.

Require only one local sales tax collector per parish by 1991.

State & Local Taxes

Ban State and local sales taxes on gasoline/motor fuels which are subject to an excise tax.

Make eligible for industrial tax exemption new distribution facilities and additions to existing facilities.

Create a board to waive all or part of inventory taxes on new or expanded manufacturing or distribution facilities.

State Financial Procedures

Require the state to maintain balanced budgets but if deficits occur, pay them off the next year.

Give constitutional status to the Revenue Estimating Conference which provides official projections of state revenues.

Limit growth in state spending to growth in state personal income. Use excess money for a “rainy day fund.”

Stabilize effect of erratic mineral revenue on the state operating budget by dedicating certain mineral revenue to a trust fund; allow interest to be used to finance unfunded liability of retirement systems, repay state debt or other purposes provided by law.

Create a central authority and a dedicated fund to protect Louisiana wetlands.

Create a transportation fund with phase-in of dedicated revenues for highways, bridges and other public works. Guarantee at least one cent of the gasoline/motor fuel tax to Parish Transportation Fund.

Constitutionally protect projects in a new program (TIME) to provide four-lane highways linking cities of 5,000 population or more, and to fund other capital projects.

Tighten spending from the interest earnings of the Louisiana Quality Education Trust Fund [8 (g)] for administrative costs and for elementary-secondary programs not in the state school aid formula.

Dedicate motor vehicle license taxes to state and local roads and state police.

Dedicate one third of new severance tax on lignite, up to $100,000 per year, to each parish where production occurs.

Make constitutional the practice of colleges not sending their fees and charges through the state treasury.

Require budgetary control of boards that do not deposit their fees in the state treasury but receive state general funds; provide budgetary oversight of retirement boards.

Repeal dedication of the first-use tax which the U.S. Supreme Court declared unconstitutional.

Repeal the defunct Louisiana Investment Fund for Enhancement (LIFE) intended to siphon off excess state mineral revenues.

Act 1 (Representative Gomez) of the 1989 First Special Session, amending Article VII and repealing Article VI, Section 28, and Article IX, Sections 9 and 10.

FAILED

October 1, 1988 Election

(1) Five-Year Property Tax Assessment Freeze for Housing Restoration — A vote for would permit selective five-year property tax abatements on improvements to housing under certain conditions. A vote against would deny the authority to grant such tax abatements.

Act 1008 (Representative C. R. Jones) of the 1988 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (I)

FAILED

November 21, 1987 Election

(1) Appointment of Temporary Lower Court Judges — A vote for would give the state supreme court sole authority to provide for temporary appointments of lower court judges and eliminate legislative involvement in this area. A vote against would continue the present system which is governed by state law.

Act 945 (Senator Casey) of 1987 Regular Session, amending article V, Section 5 (A)

PASSED—FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%

(2) Constitutional Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation Fund — A vote for would give the statutory fund constitutional status and eliminate the Legislature’s ability to change revenue sources dedicated to the fund or the ways monies in it could be spent. A vote against would continue the present situation of a conservation fund created by law and subject to change by legislative action.

Act 946 (Senator McPherson) of 1987 Regular Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 10-A

PASSED—FOR: 67% AGAINST: 33%

(3) Actuarial Funding, Retirement Systems — A vote for would set a firm policy requiring actuarially sound funding for public employee retirement systems with increased contributions to the systems in the near term but much greater savings in the future. A vote against would permit the Legislature to continue setting retirement funding policy each year.

Act 947 (Representative Bella) of 1987 Regular Session, amending Article X, adding Section 29 (E)

PASSED—FOR: 68% AGAINST: 32%

(4) Legislature or BESE Authority Over State School Aid Program — A vote for would give BESE rather than the Legislature the power to decide components and objectives of a minimum education program for public elementary-secondary schools and how much must be appropriated to pay for it. A vote against would allow these decisions to be made by the Legislature.

Act 948 (Representative Laborde) of 1987 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 13 (B)

PASSED—FOR: 56% AGAINST: 44%

(5) Nominees, New Orleans City Civil Service Commission — A vote for would result in an employee-elected member serving on the New Orleans city civil service commission. A vote against would allow the New Orleans city council to continue making future appointments in the manner they choose.

Act 949 (Representative Gee) of 1987 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 4 (B) and (D) and adding Section 4 (E)

PASSED—FOR: 52% AGAINST: 48%

September 27, 1986 Election

(1) Dedicate 8(g) Windfall — A vote for would constitutionally dedicate all but the first $100 million to be received from the federal government in the 8 (g) settlement to a permanent trust fund for investment, and allocate three-fourths of interest earnings and future recurring revenues for appropriation to quality education programs and academic research. A vote against would statutorily dedicate the 8 (g) settlement to a permanent trust fund.

Act 1020 (Senator Hudson) of 1985 Regular Session, amending Article VII, adding Section 10.1

PASSED—FOR: 77% AGAINST: 23%

(2) Limit Levee District Taxes — A vote for would add an additional five-mill limit on the property taxes a levee district must levy to pay for land or improvements used or destroyed for levee purposes after its other available resources and constitutional millage authority have been exhausted. A vote against would retain the current five-mill constitutional limit on property taxes.

Act 1019 (Representative Laborde) of 1985 Regular Session, amending Article VI, Section 42 (A)

FAILED

(3) Fill a Nominating Vacancy for New Orleans Civil Service Commission — A vote for would replace St. Mary’s Dominican College (in the process of closing) as a nomination source for a person to serve on the New Orleans city civil service commission with the University of New Orleans and Southern University at New Orleans. A vote against would allow the New Orleans city council to make future appointments in the manner they choose.

Act 1018 (Representative C. R. Jones) of 1985 Regular Session, amending Article X, Sections 4 (B) and (D) and adding Section 4 (E)

FAILED

(4) Permit Increase in $3 Auto License Tag — A vote for would authorize the Legislature to levy an annual license tax on private automobiles (now $3) to a maximum of $25 and add value as a criterion for license taxes levied on other types of motor vehicles. A vote against would retain the $3 flat rate annual automobile license tax mandated by the constitution since 1940.

Act 1080 (Senator Windhorst) of 1986 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 5.

FAILED

(5) Relax Restriction on Refunding State Debt — A vote for would allow the Legislature to refund short-term debt at a higher interest rate when the purpose is to extend the time for repaying the debt. A vote against would only allow the Legislature to refund outstanding indebtedness at the same or lower interest rate.

Act 1083 (Representative Leach) of 1986 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 6 (A).

FAILED

(6) Clarify Authority of Supreme Court to Appoint Temporary Judges — A vote for would give the Louisiana Supreme Court sole authority to provide by rule for appointments of attorneys as temporary or ad hoc judges of city, municipal, traffic, parish, juvenile or family courts. A vote against would retain the Code of Civil Procedure provisions for appointment of temporary judges subject to legislative involvement.

Act 1081 (Senator Casey) of 1986 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 5 (A)

FAILED

(7) Shorten the “Lame Duck” Period for Statewide Elected Officials — A vote for would change the date statewide elected officials and members of the Legislature take office to the second Monday in January. A vote against would retain the current date of the second Monday in March.

Act 1082 (Representative Dastugue) of 1986 Regular Session, amending Article IV, Section 3 (A), adding Article IV, Section 3 (D) and repealing Article XIV, Section 29

PASSED—FOR: 59% AGAINST: 41%

November 6, 1984 Election

(1) Limit State Spending, Use Surpluses for a Rainy Day Fund and Economic Development — A vote for would limit growth in recurring state spending and use surpluses, including possible windfalls from settlements on offshore mineral revenue, for a “rainy day” fund should revenues fall below estimates, and for a permanent trust fund, with earnings from investment used to finance a variety of programs aimed at economic development. A vote against would continue current spending practices.

Act 963 (Senator Hudson) of 1984 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 10 (B) and adding Section 10-A

FAILED

(2) Vehicle Inventory Tax Exemption — A vote for would exempt motor vehicles held in inventory from state, parish and special ad valorem taxes. A vote against would continue to require motor vehicle dealers to pay property taxes on vehicles held as business inventory.

Act 960 (Senator Poston) of 1984 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (E)

FAILED

(3) Corporate Income Tax Increase — A vote for would increase the state corporate income tax by eliminating deduction of the federal tax except for a minimum of $1,000 for a corporation. A vote against would maintain the federal tax deduction for state corporate income taxes.

Act 15 (Representative Laborde) of 1984 First Extraordinary Session, amending Article VII, Section 4 (a), and Article XIV by adding Part V.

FAILED

(4) Organizational Sessions of the Legislature — A vote for would require in the constitution an organizational session for a newly elected Legislature prior to the regular session. A vote against would continue organizational sessions under House and Senate rules instead of constitutional authority.

Act 962 (Representative Bruneau) of 1984 Regular Session, amending Article III, Section 2, by adding paragraph D.

FAILED

(5) New Orleans Civil Service Commission — A vote for would replace St. Mary’s Dominican College (scheduled to close in 1984) with Our Lady of Holy Cross College as one of the private colleges that nominates persons to serve on the New Orleans city civil service commission. A vote against would allow the New Orleans city council to make future appointments in the manner they choose.

Act 961 (Representative Hainkel) of 1984 Regular Session, amending Article X, Section 4 (B)

FAILED

October 22, 1983 Election

(1) Fewer Special Elections for Judges — A vote for would require a special election be held within 12 months to fill a judgeship vacancy. A vote against would continue the current requirement that a special election be held within six months to fill a judgeship vacancy.

Act 728 (Representative Bruneau) of 1983 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 22 (B)

PASSED—FOR: 70% AGAINST: 30%

(2) Authorize Return of Expropriated Property, Including Mineral Rights — A vote for would allow the Legislature to return public property, including mineral rights, to previous owners when the purpose for which the property was expropriated no longer exists. A vote against would require the state to retain the mineral rights on any of its property that is sold, unless the property was seized for taxes due.

Act 729 (Representative Patti) of 1983 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 14 (B)

PASSED—FOR: 65% AGAINST: 35%

(3) Constitutional Status for LIFE Fund — A vote for would put the state’s Louisiana Investment Fund for Enhancement (LIFE) fund and its funding formula in the constitution, require all excess oil and gas windfall money be placed in the fund, and require a two-thirds vote of the Legislature to spend money from the fund. A vote against would continue the LIFE fund in the statutes, require that only half of the excess money be placed in the fund, and allow the Legislature to spend money from the fund with a majority vote.

Act 730 (Senator Randolph) of 1983 Regular Session, amending Article IX, adding Section 10

PASSED—FOR: 63% AGAINST: 37%

September 11, 1982 Election

(1) Property Tax Exemption on All Types of Fuel Stockpiled by Electric Utilities — A vote for would provide a property tax exemption for inventories of materials, boiler fuels and other energy sources used by public utilities to generate electricity. A vote against would continue to have these inventories taxed.

Act 942 (Representative Alario) of 1981 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 (C)

PASSED—FOR: 64% AGAINST: 36%

(2) Freeze on Tax Assessments of Certain Improved Buildings — A vote for would permit local governments to give property owners an incentive to improve or develop their existing buildings in downtown, historic or economic development districts by freezing property assessments for five years at the value before the improvement. A vote against would not allow a property tax freeze for improved buildings.

Act 944 (Senator Nelson) of 1981 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 by adding paragraph (G)

PASSED—FOR: 51% AGAINST: 49%

(3) Property Tax Exemption on Coal and Lignite Stockpiled for Industrial Use, Including Electric Utilities — A vote for would provide a property tax exemption for inventories of coal and lignite used for various industrial or manufacturing purposes as well as for boiler fuel, gasification, feedstocks or processing. A vote against would continue to have these inventories taxed.

Act 943 (Representative Alario) of 1981 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 21 by adding paragraph (G)

PASSED—FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

(4) Remove Homestead Exemption on City Taxes in New Orleans — A vote for would remove the homestead exemption from certain New Orleans municipal property taxes. A vote against would maintain the homestead exemption for New Orleans municipal property taxes.

Act 880 (Senator Braden) of 1982 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 20 (A) (3)

FAILED

(5) Allow Refinancing of State Debt at Higher Interest Rates — A vote for would allow the state to refund its indebtedness at higher interest rates if the purpose is to lengthen the time for repayment. A vote against would retain in the constitution a prohibition against refunding at higher interest rates.

Act 881 (Senator Casey) of 1982 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 6 (A)

FAILED

(6) Repeal Constitutional Dedication of First-Use or Similar Tax — A vote for would repeal a provision that dedicates the proceeds of a “first-use tax” or any other “new or alternative tax” imposed on the use of gas produced beyond the state’s territorial jurisdiction. A vote against would retain this provision in the constitution.

Act 882 (Senator Casey) of 1982 Regular Session, repealing Article IX, Section 9

FAILED

(7) Allow Referees to Decide Appeals of State Civil Service Employees — A vote for would authorize the Civil Service Commission to use referees to decide appeals by state employees contesting their firing or other disciplinary action. A vote against would require the Civil Service Commission to independently decide all disputed points in every appeal.

Act 883 (Representative Weaver) of 1982 Regular Session, amending Article X, Sections 8 and 12

PASSED—FOR: 54% AGAINST: 46%

(8) Give Owners Incentive to Improve Property Acquired at a Tax Sale — A vote for would authorize the Legislature to require that the owner of property sold at a tax sale to pay costs incurred by a subsequent purchaser in order to redeem the property. A vote against would allow a property owner to redeem property sold at a tax sale without paying the purchaser for costs incurred in maintaining or improving the property.

Act 884 (Representative Delpit) of 1982 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 25 (B)

FAILED

November 4, 1980 Election

(1) Appeal of Criminal Cases — A vote for would vest jurisdiction for all criminal cases in the courts of appeal, except for direct appeal to the Supreme Court in criminal cases involving the death penalty. A vote against would continue the requirement that all criminal case appeals go directly to the Supreme Court.

Act 843 (Senator Windhorst) of 1980 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 5 (D and E), Section 8 (B) and Section 10.

PASSED

(2) Increased Homestead Exemption — A vote for would increase the property tax exemption on homesteads to $7,500 of assessed value, beginning in 1982. A vote against would leave the property tax exemption at $5,000 of assessed value.

Act 844 (Representative Alario) of 1980 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 20 (A)

PASSED

(3) Student Voting Members on Higher Education Boards — A vote for would authorize the Legislature to add one student member to the Board of Regents and allow voting rights to student members serving on all public higher education boards. A vote against would deny a student serving on a higher education management board a vote and would not authorize a student member position for the Board of Regents.

Act 842 (Senator Osterberger) of 1980 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 8 (B)

PASSED

(4) Property Tax Millage Adjustment — A vote for would mandate property tax millage (tax rate) adjustments at each reappraisal and permit taxing bodies to restore rolled back millages without voter approval. A vote against would keep property tax millages at the same level with no rollback after a reappraisal.

Act 1 (Representative D’Gerolamo) of 1980 Second Extraordinary Session, amending Article VII, Section 23.

PASSED

October 27, 1979 Election

(1) Raising Assessments on Public Service Property — A vote for would create a new classification for assessing public service property, excluding electrical cooperatives and land, and raise that assessment from 15% to 25% of fair market value. A vote against would maintain the two classifications and rates currently in the constitution.

Act 799 (Representative M. Thompson) of 1979 Regular Session, amending Article VII, Section 18 (B).

PASSED—FOR: 60% AGAINST: 40%

(2) Adult Trials for Certain Juvenile Offenders — A vote for would rectify existing inconsistencies in offenses for which a juvenile may be tried as an adult and allow the Legislature to expand the list of such offenses. A vote against would maintain an obsolete list of offenses in the constitution.

Act 801 (Representative Faucheux) of 1979 Regular Session, amending Article V, Section 19.

PASSED—FOR: 69% AGAINST: 31%

(3) Four-Year Concurrent Terms for BESE — A vote for would change the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) members terms to four-year terms concurrent with the governor and state superintendent of education. A vote against would maintain the Board’s current six-year staggered terms.

Act 800 (Senator Williamson) of 1979 Regular Session, amending Article VIII, Section 3 (B) and adding Section 15.

PASSED—FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%

November 7, 1978 Election

(1) Constitutionally Dedicate First-Use Tax — A vote for would prevent future governors and legislatures from spending money from the first-use or similar tax, except to: (1) finance tax credits to those unable to shift the tax to others; (2) establish an irrevocable $500 million trust fund; (3) pay off state debt ahead of time; and (4) preserve the state’s now-eroding coastline. A vote against would continue to allow the governor and legislature to decide how to spend money from the first-use or similar tax.

Act 797 (Representative Tauzin) of 1978 Regular Session, amending Article IX by adding Section 9.

PASSED—FOR: 61% AGAINST: 39%

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